Complex Position Size

For complex, multi-leg options positions comprising two or more legs, TWS might not track all changes to this position, e.g. a vertical spread where the short leg is assigned and the user re-writes the same leg the next day, or if the user creates a the position over multiple trades, or if the order is not filled as a native combination at the exchange.

If you received a message because you are submitting an order to close a position, roll a position, or modify a position using the “% Change” feature, it means that the maximum quantity of option positions in your account that are available to close for this order is different from that of the original position tracked by TWS.
Before submitting, you should review the order and confirm that the order quantity we have calculated is the correct quantity that you want to trade.

流動性の追加と削除

概観: 

この記事は個別の手数料体系を利用する際の、取引所手数料および流動性追加および削除手数料の理解を目的としています。

 

流動性の追加と削除は、株式および株式/指数オプションの両方に適用されるコンセプトです。ある注文が流動性を追加または削除するかは、その注文が約定の付くものであるかないかによります。

約定の付く注文は流動性を下げます。
約定の付く注文とは成行注文、もしくは指値が現在の市場価格かまたはそれ以上/以下になる、買い/売りの指値注文を指します。

1. 約定の付く買いの指値注文の場合、指値価格はアスク以上となります。

2. 約定の付く売りの指値注文の場合、指値価格はビッド以下となります。

例:
XYZ株の現在のアスク(オファー)サイズ/価格は、46.00で400株です。100 XYZ株 @ 46.01で、買いの指値注文を発注します。この注文はすぐに約定可能なため、約定が付くとみなされます。 流動性を下げるにあたって取引所手数料が発生する場合、これがお客様に請求されます。


 

約定の付かない注文は流動性を追加します。
約定の付かない注文とは、指値価格が現在の市場価格以下/以上の買い/売りの指値注文を指します。

1. 約定の付かない買いの指値注文の場合、指値価格はアスク以下となります。

2. 約定の付かない売りの指値注文の場合、指値価格はビッド以上となります。

例:
XYZ株の現在のアスク(オファー)サイズ/価格は、46.00で400株です。100 XYZ株 @ 45.99で、売りの指値注文を発注します。この注文はすぐに約定はせずに最良ビッドとして市場に出されるため、約定が付かないとみなされます。
お客様の指値注文を約定させる結果となる約定性のある売り注文を誰かが発注した場合、流動性追加手数料があればお客様にリベート(クレジット)が発生します。

留意点:
1. オプション取引をする口座はすべて、オプション取引所による流動性削除/追加手数料またはクレジットの対象となります。
2. 弊社のウェブサイトにおいては、流動性削除/追加体系内で負数のものだけが、リベート(クレジット)となります。

https://www.interactivebrokers.co.jp/jp/index.php?f=2763
上記のリンクは株式およびオプションの手数料/費用に関する参照となります。

米国オプションに対し異なる手数料請求が発生する理由

IBのオプション手数料の請求は、ふたつの要素から成り立っています:

1. 弊社に蓄積される約定手数料。 スマートルーティングされる注文への手数料はコントラクト1枚あたり$0.70に設定され、これは1ヶ月内の注文のコントラクトが100,000枚を超えた場合、コントラクト1枚あたり$0.15まで下がります(ダイレクトルーティングされる注文、プレミアムオプションに対するディスカウントレートおよび最低注文料金に関してはウェブサイトをご覧ください)、および 

2. 第三者機関である取引所手数料、規制手数料および/または取引手数料。

第三者機関による手数料に関し、特定の米国オプション取引所では流動性手数料/リベート体系を設けています。これは弊社の約定手数料やその他の規制手数料/取引手数料と集約されると、注文によって異なるコントラクトあたりに請求される総合手数料となることがあります。 これは手数料の請求ではなく顧客への支払いに転じる可能性もある、取引所の計算部分に起因するものです。これには注文の特性や現行のビッド/アスクのクオートなど、弊社の範疇外となる要因が含まれます。

流動性手数料/リベートモデルに基いて運営している取引所では、流動性を移動する注文(約定の付く注文)に対しては手数料を請求し、流動性を追加する注文(約定の付かない指値注文)に対してはクレジットを提供します。手数料は取引所や顧客タイプ(一般、ブローカー・ディーラー、企業、マーケットメーカー、プロフェッショナルなど)、また一般の顧客に対し通常$0.10 - $0.42の範囲となるリベート(クレジット)、および$0.15 - $0.50の手数料のオプション原資産によって変わります。 

弊社は約定の付くオプション注文を約定価格の一番良い取引所にルーティングするよう義務付けられており、どの取引所にルーティングをするかを決定するにあたって利用可能な市場が複数存在する場合、スマートルーターは流動性移動手数料も考慮の上で発注を行います。 このためスマートルーターは、市場が少なくとも$0.01(オプション乗数が標準の100の場合、$1.00の価格向上につながります)良くなる可能性がある場合には、手数料の一番高い取引所に成行注文のみをルーティングします。

流動性の追加/移動に関する詳細および例に関しましては、KB201をご参照ください。

Risks of Volatility Products

Trading and investing in volatility-related Exchange-Traded Products (ETPs) is not appropriate for all investors and presents different risks than other types of products. Among other things, ETPs are subject to the risks you may face if investing in the components of the ETP, including the risks relating to investing in complex securities (such as futures and swaps) and risks associated with the effects of leveraged investing in geared funds. Investors should be familiar with the diverse characteristics of each ETF, ETN, future, option, swap and any other relevant security type. We have summarized several risk factors (as identified in prospectuses for ETPs and in other sources) and included links so you can conduct further research. Please keep in mind that this is not a complete list of the risks associated with these products and investors are responsible for understanding and familiarizing themselves completely before entering into risk-taking activities. By providing this information, Interactive Brokers (IB) is not offering investment or trading advice regarding ETPs to any customer. Customers (and/or their independent financial advisors) must decide for themselves whether ETPs are an appropriate investment for their portfolios.

 
An ETP may not be benchmarked to the index it appears to track
"An investor should only consider an investment in a Fund if he or she understands the consequences of seeking exposure to VIX futures contracts. The Funds are benchmarked to the S&P VIX Short-Term Futures Index, an investable index of VIX futures contracts. The Funds are not benchmarked to the VIX Index. The VIX Index is a non-investable index that measures the implied volatility of the S&P 500. For these purposes, "implied volatility" is a measure of the expected volatility (i.e., the rate and magnitude of variations in performance) of the S&P 500 over the next 30 days. The VIX Index does not represent the actual volatility of the S&P 500. The VIX Index is calculated based on the prices of a constantly changing portfolio of S&P 500 put and call options. The Index underlying each Fund consists of short-term VIX futures contracts. As such, the performance of the Index and the Funds can be expected to be very different from the actual volatility of the S&P 500 or the performance of the VIX Index."   [Page 1]
 
"… your ability to benefit from any rise or fall in the level of the VIX Index is limited. The Index underlying your ETNs is based upon holding a rolling long position in futures on the VIX Index. These futures will not necessarily track the performance of the VIX Index. Your ETNs may not benefit from increases in the level of the VIX Index because such increases will not necessarily cause the level of VIX Index futures to rise. Accordingly, a hypothetical investment that was linked directly to the VIX Index could generate a higher return than your ETNs."   [Page PS-12]
 
ETPs may not provide a suitable hedge
"Historical correlation trends between the Index and other asset classes may not continue or may reverse, limiting or eliminating any potential diversification or other benefit from owning a Fund."   [Page 20]
 
Volatility based ETPs are volatile in themselves and are not intended for long term investment
"… investments can be highly volatile and the Funds may experience large losses from buying, selling or holding such investments. ... In addition, gains, if any, may be subject to significant and unexpected reversals. The Funds generally are intended to be used only for short-term investment horizons. As with all investments, an investor in any of the Funds could potentially lose the full principal value of his/her investment, even over periods as short as one day."   [Page 1]
 
"The ETNs are only suitable for a very short investment horizon. The relationship between the level of the VIX Index and the underlying futures on the VIX Index will begin to break down as the length of an investor’s holding period increases, even within the course of a single Index Business Day. ... The ETNs are not long term substitutes for long or short positions in the futures underlying the VIX Index. ... The long term expected value of your ETNs is zero. If you hold your ETNs as a long term investment, it is likely that you will lose all or a substantial portion of your investment. "   [Page PS-15]
 
The use of leveraged positions could result in the total loss of an investment
"The Ultra Fund utilizes leverage in seeking to achieve its investment objective and will lose more money in market environments adverse to its respective daily investment objectives than funds that do not employ leverage…
 
For example, because the Ultra Fund includes a two times (2x) multiplier, a single-day movement in the Index approaching 50% at any point in the day could result in the total loss or almost total loss of an investor’s investment if that movement is contrary to the investment objective of the Fund, even if the Index subsequently moves in an opposite direction, eliminating all or a portion of the movement…
 
Inverse positions can also result in the total loss of an investor’s investment. For the Inverse Fund, a single-day or intraday increase in the level of the Fund’s benchmark approaching 100% could result in the total loss or almost total loss of an investor’s investment, even if such Fund’s benchmark subsequently moves lower. "   [Page 14]
 
Possible illiquid markets may exacerbate losses
"Financial Instruments cannot always be liquidated at the desired price. It is difficult to execute a trade at a specific price when there is a relatively small volume of buy and sell orders in a market. A market disruption can also make it difficult to liquidate a position or find a swap counterparty at a reasonable cost. "   [Page 17]
 
Short covering may intensify losses in volatility-related ETPs
In the event of a sudden market volatility change, many traders with positions in volatility-related products will incur substantial unexpected losses. These losses may cause them to choose to close their positions. The losses may also result in margin deficits and subsequent liquidations of some or all positions. Such closing trades will add to the movement of these products. Since speculative interest in the VIX is at an all-time high, there may be no precedent for what will happen if volatility moves quickly.
 
The Commodity Futures Trading Commission's (CFTC) weekly Commitments of Traders (COT) report provides a breakdown of the net positions for "non-commercial" (speculative) traders in U.S. futures markets. As of September 2017 CFTC reported VIX speculative net short is at an all-time high.
 
"Despite the fact that the average daily closing value of the CBOE Volatility Index (VIX) is about 11.5 so far this year, VIX futures and options both had record days for volume and for open interest this month. … VIX futures hit a new record for open interest with more than 673,000 contracts on August 7 (2017), and VIX options reached a new record for open interest with 14,783,380 contracts open on August 15 (2017)."
 
*As this data is constantly changing, investors in volatility-related products should regularly check for updates.
 
ETP issuers may redeem shares for cash in the event of extreme moves
"The Intraday Indicative Value on any Index Business Day could be reduced to 20% or less of the prior day’s Closing Indicative Value. If this occurs, we may choose to exercise our right to effect an Event Acceleration of the ETNs for an amount equal to that day’s Closing Indicative Value and you may not receive any of your initial investment."   [Page PS-17]

優先またはプロフェッショナルに分類されるお客様の注文

2009年第四四半期、特定の米国オプション取引所(CBOEおよびISE)において、「プロフェッショナル」(ブローカーディーラーと同じような方法で取引を行うことのできる情報および/またはテクノロジーにアクセスのある個人や機関)とみなされる一般顧客からの注文を区別する規則が実施されました。これに基づき、ブローカーディーラーではなく、特定の月に自身の口座のために毎日平均で390以上の上場オプション注文(約定したかどうかに関わらず)をすべてのオプション取引所に発注する口座は、プロフェッショナルとみなされるようになります。CBOEおよびISEによるオリジナルの実施以降、その他ほとんどの米国オプション取引所においても、「プロフェッショナル」注文の区別が実施されるようになりました。

プロフェッショナルのお客様の代理としてこれらオプション取引所に発注される注文は約定の優先を目的としてブローカーディーラーとして取り扱われ、リベート($0.65)から$1.12の手数料(オプションクラスにより)の範囲内で、コントラクトあたりの手数料の対象となります。 

ブローカーは暦四半期ごとにレビューを行い、この期間中の1ヶ月間に390注文の枠を超え、次の暦四半期にプロフェッショナルとして指定されるべき顧客を割り出すことが義務付けられます。この確認の際、スプレッド注文はスプレッドの各レッグを個別の注文として数えるのではなく、スプレッド注文ごとにひとつの注文として数えます。これによる影響のあるお客様には弊社よりご連絡を差し上げます。またスマートルーティング注文は、新しく発生する取引所手数料を考慮の上でルーティング先を決定するようにデザインされています。

詳細は以下のリンクをご覧ください:

ISE Regulatory Circular 2009-179

CBOE Regulatory Circular RG09-148

Allocation of Partial Fills

Title:

How are executions allocated when an order receives a partial fill because an insufficient quantity is available to complete the allocation of shares/contracts to sub-accounts?

 

Overview:

From time-to-time, one may experience an allocation order which is partially executed and is canceled prior to being completed (i.e. market closes, contract expires, halts due to news, prices move in an unfavorable direction, etc.). In such cases, IB determines which customers (who were originally included in the order group and/or profile) will receive the executed shares/contracts. The methodology used by IB to impartially determine who receives the shares/contacts in the event of a partial fill is described in this article.

 

Background:

Before placing an order CTAs and FAs are given the ability to predetermine the method by which an execution is to be allocated amongst client accounts. They can do so by first creating a group (i.e. ratio/percentage) or profile (i.e. specific amount) wherein a distinct number of shares/contracts are specified per client account (i.e. pre-trade allocation). These amounts can be prearranged based on certain account values including the clients’ Net Liquidation Total, Available Equity, etc., or indicated prior to the order execution using Ratios, Percentages, etc. Each group and/or profile is generally created with the assumption that the order will be executed in full. However, as we will see, this is not always the case. Therefore, we are providing examples that describe and demonstrate the process used to allocate partial executions with pre-defined groups and/or profiles and how the allocations are determined.

Here is the list of allocation methods with brief descriptions about how they work.

·         AvailableEquity
Use sub account’ available equality value as ratio. 

·         NetLiq
Use subaccount’ net liquidation value as ratio

·         EqualQuantity
Same ratio for each account

·         PctChange1:Portion of the allocation logic is in Trader Workstation (the initial calculation of the desired quantities per account).

·         Profile

The ratio is prescribed by the user

·         Inline Profile

The ratio is prescribed by the user.

·         Model1:
Roughly speaking, we use each account NLV in the model as the desired ratio. It is possible to dynamically add (invest) or remove (divest) accounts to/from a model, which can change allocation of the existing orders.

 

 

 

Basic Examples:

Details:

CTA/FA has 3-clients with a predefined profile titled “XYZ commodities” for orders of 50 contracts which (upon execution) are allocated as follows:

Account (A) = 25 contracts

Account (B) = 15 contracts

Account (C) = 10 contracts

 

Example #1:

CTA/FA creates a DAY order to buy 50 Sept 2016 XYZ future contracts and specifies “XYZ commodities” as the predefined allocation profile. Upon transmission at 10 am (ET) the order begins to execute2but in very small portions and over a very long period of time. At 2 pm (ET) the order is canceled prior to being executed in full. As a result, only a portion of the order is filled (i.e., 7 of the 50 contracts are filled or 14%). For each account the system initially allocates by rounding fractional amounts down to whole numbers:

 

Account (A) = 14% of 25 = 3.5 rounded down to 3

Account (B) = 14% of 15 = 2.1 rounded down to 2

Account (C) = 14% of 10 = 1.4 rounded down to 1

 

To Summarize:

A: initially receives 3 contracts, which is 3/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.12)

B: initially receives 2 contracts, which is 2/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.134)

C: initially receives 1 contract, which is 1/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.10)

 

The system then allocates the next (and final) contract to an account with the smallest ratio (i.e. Account C which currently has a ratio of 0.10).

A: final allocation of 3 contracts, which is 3/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.12)

B: final allocation of 2 contracts, which is 2/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.134)

C: final allocation of 2 contract, which is 2/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.20)

The execution(s) received have now been allocated in full.

 

Example #2:

CTA/FA creates a DAY order to buy 50 Sept 2016 XYZ future contracts and specifies “XYZ commodities” as the predefined allocation profile. Upon transmission at 11 am (ET) the order begins to be filled3 but in very small portions and over a very long period of time. At 1 pm (ET) the order is canceled prior being executed in full. As a result, only a portion of the order is executed (i.e., 5 of the 50 contracts are filled or 10%).For each account, the system initially allocates by rounding fractional amounts down to whole numbers:

 

Account (A) = 10% of 25 = 2.5 rounded down to 2

Account (B) = 10% of 15 = 1.5 rounded down to 1

Account (C) = 10% of 10 = 1 (no rounding necessary)

 

To Summarize:

A: initially receives 2 contracts, which is 2/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.08)

B: initially receives 1 contract, which is 1/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.067)

C: initially receives 1 contract, which is 1/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.10)

The system then allocates the next (and final) contract to an account with the smallest ratio (i.e. to Account B which currently has a ratio of 0.067).

A: final allocation of 2 contracts, which is 2/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.08)

B: final allocation of 2 contracts, which is 2/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.134)

C: final allocation of 1 contract, which is 1/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.10)

 

The execution(s) received have now been allocated in full.

Example #3:

CTA/FA creates a DAY order to buy 50 Sept 2016 XYZ future contracts and specifies “XYZ commodities” as the predefined allocation profile. Upon transmission at 11 am (ET) the order begins to be executed2  but in very small portions and over a very long period of time. At 12 pm (ET) the order is canceled prior to being executed in full. As a result, only a portion of the order is filled (i.e., 3 of the 50 contracts are filled or 6%). Normally the system initially allocates by rounding fractional amounts down to whole numbers, however for a fill size of less than 4 shares/contracts, IB first allocates based on the following random allocation methodology.

 

In this case, since the fill size is 3, we skip the rounding fractional amounts down.

 

For the first share/contract, all A, B and C have the same initial fill ratio and fill quantity, so we randomly pick an account and allocate this share/contract. The system randomly chose account A for allocation of the first share/contract.

 

To Summarize3:

A: initially receives 1 contract, which is 1/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.04)

B: initially receives 0 contracts, which is 0/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.00)

C: initially receives 0 contracts, which is 0/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.00)

 

Next, the system will perform a random allocation amongst the remaining accounts (in this case accounts B & C, each with an equal probability) to determine who will receive the next share/contract.

 

The system randomly chose account B for allocation of the second share/contract.

A: 1 contract, which is 1/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.04)

B: 1 contract, which is 1/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.067)

C: 0 contracts, which is 0/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.00)

 

The system then allocates the final [3] share/contract to an account(s) with the smallest ratio (i.e. Account C which currently has a ratio of 0.00).

A: final allocation of 1 contract, which is 1/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.04)

B: final allocation of 1 contract, which is 1/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.067)

C: final allocation of 1 contract, which is 1/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.10)

 

The execution(s) received have now been allocated in full.

 

Available allocation Flags

Besides the allocation methods above, user can choose the following flags, which also influence the allocation:

·         Strict per-account allocation.
For the initially submitted order if one or more subaccounts are rejected by the credit checking, we reject the whole order.

·         “Close positions first”1.This is the default handling mode for all orders which close a position (whether or not they are also opening position on the other side or not). The calculation are slightly different and ensure that we do not start opening position for one account if another account still has a position to close, except in few more complex cases.


Other factor affects allocations:

1)      Mutual Fund: the allocation has two steps. The first execution report is received before market open. We allocate based onMonetaryValue for buy order and MonetaryValueShares for sell order. Later, when second execution report which has the NetAssetValue comes, we do the final allocation based on first allocation report.

2)      Allocate in Lot Size: if a user chooses (thru account config) to prefer whole-lot allocations for stocks, the calculations are more complex and will be described in the next version of this document.

3)      Combo allocation1: we allocate combo trades as a unit, resulting in slightly different calculations.

4)      Long/short split1: applied to orders for stocks, warrants or structured products. When allocating long sell orders, we only allocate to accounts which have long position: resulting in calculations being more complex.

5)      For non-guaranteed smart combo: we do allocation by each leg instead of combo.

6)      In case of trade bust or correction1: the allocations are adjusted using more complex logic.

7)      Account exclusion1: Some subaccounts could be excluded from allocation for the following reasons, no trading permission, employee restriction, broker restriction, RejectIfOpening, prop account restrictions, dynamic size violation, MoneyMarketRules restriction for mutual fund. We do not allocate to excluded accountsand we cancel the order after other accounts are filled. In case of partial restriction (e.g. account is permitted to close but not to open, or account has enough excess liquidity only for a portion of the desired position).

 

 

Footnotes:

1.        Details of these calculations will be included in the next revision of this document.

2.        To continue observing margin in each account on a real-time basis, IB allocates each trade immediately (behind the scenes) however from the CTA and/or FA (or client’s) point of view, the final distribution of the execution at an average price typically occurs when the trade is executed in full, is canceled or at the end of day (whichever happens first).

3.       If no account has a ratio greater than 1.0 or multiple accounts are tied in the final step (i.e. ratio = 0.00), the first step is skipped and allocation of the first share/contract is decided via step two (i.e. random allocation).

 

Additional Information Regarding the Use of Stop Orders

U.S. equity markets occasionally experience periods of extraordinary volatility and price dislocation. Sometimes these occurrences are prolonged and at other times they are of very short duration. Stop orders may play a role in contributing to downward price pressure and market volatility and may result in executions at prices very far from the trigger price. 

Investors may use stop sell orders to help protect a profit position in the event the price of a stock declines or to limit a loss. In addition, investors with a short position may use stop buy orders to help limit losses in the event of price increases. However, because stop orders, once triggered, become market orders, investors immediately face the same risks inherent with market orders – particularly during volatile market conditions when orders may be executed at prices materially above or below expected prices.
 
While stop orders may be a useful tool for investors to help monitor the price of their positions, stop orders are not without potential risks.  If you choose to trade using stop orders, please keep the following information in mind:
 
·         Stop prices are not guaranteed execution prices. A “stop order” becomes a “market order” when the “stop price” is reached and the resulting order is required to be executed fully and promptly at the current market price. Therefore, the price at which a stop order ultimately is executed may be very different from the investor’s “stop price.” Accordingly, while a customer may receive a prompt execution of a stop order that becomes a market order, during volatile market conditions, the execution price may be significantly different from the stop price, if the market is moving rapidly.
 
·         Stop orders may be triggered by a short-lived, dramatic price change. During periods of volatile market conditions, the price of a stock can move significantly in a short period of time and trigger an execution of a stop order (and the stock may later resume trading at its prior price level). Investors should understand that if their stop order is triggered under these circumstances, their order may be filled at an undesirable price, and the price may subsequently stabilize during the same trading day.
 
·         Sell stop orders may exacerbate price declines during times of extreme volatility. The activation of sell stop orders may add downward price pressure on a security. If triggered during a precipitous price decline, a sell stop order also is more likely to result in an execution well below the stop price.
 
·         Placing a “limit price” on a stop order may help manage some of these risks. A stop order with a “limit price” (a “stop limit” order) becomes a “limit order” when the stock reaches or exceeds the “stop price.” A “limit order” is an order to buy or sell a security for an amount no worse than a specific price (i.e., the “limit price”). By using a stop limit order instead of a regular stop order, a customer will receive additional certainty with respect to the price the customer receives for the stock. However, investors also should be aware that, because a sell order cannot be filled at a price that is lower (or a buy order for a price that is higher) than the limit price selected, there is the possibility that the order will not be filled at all. Customers should consider using limit orders in cases where they prioritize achieving a desired target price more than receiving an immediate execution irrespective of price.
 
·         The risks inherent in stop orders may be higher during illiquid market hours or around the open and close when markets may be more volatile. This may be of heightened importance for illiquid stocks, which may become even harder to sell at the then current price level and may experience added price dislocation during times of extraordinary market volatility. Customers should consider restricting the time of day during which a stop order may be triggered to prevent stop orders from activating during illiquid market hours or around the open and close when markets may be more volatile, and consider using other order types during these periods.
 
·         In light of the risks inherent in using stop orders, customers should carefully consider using other order types that may also be consistent with their trading needs.

U.S. Securities Options Exercise Limits

INTRODUCTION

Option exercise limits, along with position limits (See KB1252), have been in place since the inception of standardized trading of U.S. securities options. Their purpose is to prevent manipulative actions in underlying securities (e.g., corners or squeezes) as well as disruptions in option markets where illiquidity in a given option class exists.  These limits serve to prohibit an account, along with its related accounts, from cumulatively exercising within any five consecutive business day period, a number of options contracts in excess of the defined limit for a given equity options class (i.e., option contracts associated with a particular underlying security). This includes both early exercises and expiration exercises.

 

OVERVIEW

U.S. securities option exercise limits are established by FINRA and the U.S. options exchanges.  The exercise limits are generally the same as position limits and they can vary by option class as they take into consideration factors such as the number of shares outstanding and trading volume of the underlying security. Limits are also subject to adjustment and therefore can vary over time.  The Options Clearing Corporation (OCC), the central clearinghouse for U.S. exchange traded securities options, publishes a daily file with these limits on its public website. The link is as follows: http://www.optionsclearing.com/webapps/position-limits.  FINRA Rule 2360(b)(4) addresses exercise limits and can be found via the following website link: http://finra.complinet.com/en/display/display.html?rbid=2403&record_id=16126&element_id=6306&highlight=2360#r16126).

Note that exercise limits are applied based upon the the side of the market represented by the option position. Accordingly, all exercises of call options over the past five business days are aggregated for purposes of determining the limit for the purposes of purchasing the underlying security.  Similarly, a separate computation whereby all put exercises over the past five business days are aggregated is required for purposes of determining sales of the underlying.

 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

It's important to note that while exercise limits may be set at levels identical to position limits, it is possible for an account holder to reach an exercise limit without violating positions limits for a given option class.  This is because exercise limits are cumulative and one could conceivably purchase options up to the position limit, exercise those options and purchase additional options which, if allowed to be exercised within the five business day window, would exceed the limit.

Account holders are responsible for monitoring their cumulative options exercises as well as the exercise limit quantities to ensure compliance.  In addition, IB reserves the right to prohibit the exercise of any options, regardless of their intrinsic value or remaining maturity, if the effect of that exercise would be to violate the exercise limit rule.

満期前のコールオプション権利行使について

概要

満期前の株式コールオプションの権利行使は、以下の点により通常は経済的利点がありません:

  • オプション・タイムバリューの喪失;
  • 株式受け渡しへの支払い、借入にかかる費用の増加;
  • オプションプレミアムに関連する株式損失リスクの増加

しかしながら、支払や借入、ダウンサイドのマーケットリスク増加に対応できる口座保有者にとって、アメリカンスタイルのコールオプションの早期権利行使は支払予定の配当金の受け取りが可能なため、経済的利点が発生する可能性があります。

背景

配当金は割り当て日の株式保有者に対して支払われるため、コールオプションの保有者への支払はありません。その他の条件が同じ場合、株価は配当落ち日に配当金分、下落します。オプション価格理論上、コールオプションの価格は限月中、配当金支払い見込みが反映されたものとなりますが、配当落ち日に下落することがあります。この様なシナリオで早期権利行使が好まれる条件は以下のような場合です:

1. オプションがディープ・イン・ザ・マネーでデルタが100

2. オプションのタイムバリューが少額、もしくはゼロ

3. 配当金が比較的高く、配当落ち日がオプション満期日の前にある


早期権利行使の影響を例にして見てみます。口座の現金残高が$9,000であり、架空の株式ABCのロング・コール(権利行使価格$90.00)が10日後に満期を迎えると仮定します。ABCの株価は$100.00、配当金額は1株あたり$2.00、権利落ち日は明日であるとします。また、オプション価格と株価の動向は類似しており、権利落ち後に配当金額分下落すると仮定します。

100株のデルタポジションを、パリティ価格でのオプションの売却とパリティ価格以上でのオプションの売却の二つのオプション価格をを想定し、資産の最大化を査定します。

シナリオ1:オプション価格がパリティの時 - $10.00
パリティ価格でオプションが取引されている場合、株式が配当落ち後に資金に変わる際、早期権利行使でポジションデルタを維持し、ロングオプションの損失を避けます。現金は権利行使価格で株式を購入するために使用され、オプションプレミアムは喪失し、株式および配当金受取は口座に反映されます。これは配当落ち日の前にオプションを売却し、株式を購入することで達成できますが、手数用およびスプレッドも考慮してください:

シナリオ1

口座

バランス

当初

バランス

早期

権利行使

アクション

無し

オプション売

&株式買

現金 $9,000 $0 $9,000 $0
オプション $1,000 $0 $800 $0
株式 $0 $9,800 $0 $9,800
配当金受取 $0 $200 $0 $200
資産合計 $10,000 $10,000 $9,800 $10,000

 

 

シナリオ2:オプション価格がパリティ価格より上の時 - $11.00
パリティ価格以上でオプションが取り引きされる場合、配当金確保のための早期権利行使には経済的利点がない場合があります。このシナリオでは早期権利行使によりオプション・タイムバリューに$100の損失が発生しますが、オプションを売却して株式を購入した場合、手数料を差し引いた結果、アクションを取らない方がかえって良い可能性もあります。この場合、最も好まれるアクションはオプションを取らないことです。

シナリオ2

口座

バランス

当初

バランス

早期

権利行使

アクション

無し

オプション売

&株式買
現金 $9,000 $0 $9,000 $100
オプション $1,100 $0 $900 $0
株式 $0 $9,800 $0 $9,800
配当金受取 $0 $200 $0 $200
資産合計 $10,100 $10,000 $9,900 $10,100

  

注意: ロングコール・ポジションをスプレッド取引の一部として保有している場合には、ショートポジションの割り当てが発生した際に、ロングポジションの権利行使を行わないリスクに特に注意を払う必要があります。割り当て日に株式ショートポジションを保有していて、ショートコールの割り当てが発生した場合、株式の貸し手に配当金を支払う義務が発生しますのでご注意ください。また、権利行使処理を行うクリアリング機関は、割り当ての対応として権利行使処理を行いません。

例:SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust(SPY)のショート100枚(March '13 権利行使$146)とロング100枚(March '13 権利行使$147)を含むクレジットコール(ベア)スプレッドを例にとって考えて見ます。2013年3月14日に1株あたり$0.69372の配当金が発表されたとします。2013年3月19日付で、20134月30日支払の配当金支払見込みが株主の口座に反映されました。米国株式の3営業日決済により、配当金を受け取るには2013年3月14日までに株式の購入、もしくはコールオプションの権利行使を行わなければなりません。それ以降は配当落ち株式となります。

2013年3月14日には満期まで取引日が1日しか残されていません。二つのオプションはパリティ価格で取引され、1枚当たり$100、または100枚のポジションに$10,00の最大リスクが伴います。しかし、配当金の受け取りと、配当金受取を見込んだ、相手方の割り当てからの保護としてのロングコールの権利行使に失敗するとショートコール割り当てに対する配当金支払い義務が発生し、1枚当たり$67.372、または100枚のポジションに$6,737.20の追加のリスクが発生します。以下の表の通り、ショートコール・オプションの割り当てが発生しなかった場合、ポジションの最終決済価格が2013年3月15日に決定し、最大損失リスクは1枚あたり$100に留まります。

期日 SPY 終値 March '13 $146 コール March '13 $147 コール
March 14, 2013 $156.73 $10.73 $9.83
March 15, 2013 $155.83   $9.73 $8.83

お持ちのお口座が米国債ルール871(m)により米国源泉徴収税の対象となっている場合、権利落ち日前に一度ロングポジションをクローズし、権利落ち日後に再度オープンされることにより、効果的に作用する可能性があります。

早期権利行使通知の提出方法については弊社ウェブサイトをご確認ください。

このページは情報提供のみを目的とするものであり、推奨や取引アドバイスではなく、早期権利行使がすべてのお客様やトレーダーに適していることを結論付けるものではありません。口座を保有されるお客様は専門の税理士にご相談の上、早期権利行使による課税への影響をご確認ください。また、ロングポジションの変わりに株式ポジションを保有するにあたって発生する可能性のあるリスクにご注意ください。

"EMIR": Reporting to Trade Repository Obligations and Interactive Brokers Delegated Service to help meet your obligations

 

1. Background: In 2009 the G20 pledged to undertake reforms aimed at increasing transparency and reducing counterparty risk in the OTC derivatives market post the financial crisis of 2008. The European market infrastructure regulation (“EMIR”) implements most of these pledges in the EU. EMIR is a EU regulation and entered into force on 16 August 2012.
 
2. Financial instruments and asset classes reportable under EMIR: OTC and Exchange Traded derivatives for the following asset classes: credit, interest, equity, commodity and foreign exchange derivatives Reporting obligation does not apply to exchange traded warrants.
 
3. Who do EMIR reporting obligations apply to: Reporting obligations normally apply to all counterparties established in the EU with the exception of natural persons. They apply to:
* Financial Counterparties (“FC”)
* Non-financial counterparties above the clearing threshold (“NFC+”)
* Non-financial counterparties below the clearing threshold (“NFC-“)
* Third country Entities outside the EU (“TCE”) in some limited circumstances
 
The reporting obligations essentially apply to any entity established in the EU that has entered into a derivatives contract.
 
4. Financial counterparties (“FC”): include banks, investment firms, credit institutions, insurers, UCITS and pension schemes and Alternative Investment Fund managed by an AIFM. The Alternative Investment Fund (“AIF”) will only become an FC if the manager of that AIF is authorised under the Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive (“AIFMD”), so a fund outside the EU may be subject to EMIR reporting requirements.
 
5. Non-Financial Counterparty (“NFC”): A NFC is defined as an undertaking established in the EU other than those defined as a FC or a Central Counterparty (“CCP”), like the Clearing Houses. NFCs have lesser obligations than FCs. But when an NFC breaches a “clearing threshold” it becomes an NFC+, when it is subject to almost the same obligations as FCs (including collateral and valuation reporting). NFCs below the clearing threshold are known as NFC-s. In practice anyone other than a natural individual person (i.e. an individual or individuals operating a joint
account) is defined as an NFC- and subject to reporting obligations.
 
INTERACTIVE BROKERS DELEGATED REPORTING SERVICE TO HELP MEET YOUR REPORTING OBLIGATIONS
 
6. What service will Interactive Brokers offer to its customers to facilitate them fulfill their reporting obligations i.e. will it offer a delegated service for trade reporting as well as facilitating issuance of LEI: As noted above, both FCs and NFCs must report details of their transactions (both OTC and ETD) to authorized Trade Repositories. This obligation can be discharged directly through a Trade Repository, or by delegating the operational aspects of reporting to the counterparty or a third party (who submits reports on their behalf).
 
Interactive Brokers intends to facilitate the issuance of LEIs and offer delegated reporting to customers for whom it executes and clear trades, subject to customer consent, to the extent it is possible to do so from an operational, legal and regulatory perspective.
 
If you are subject to EMIR Reporting you will shortly be able to log into the IB Account Management system and apply for an LEI and delegate your reporting to Interactive Brokers.
 
We intend to include valuation reporting but only if and to the extent and for so long as it is permissible for Interactive brokers to do so from a legal and regulatory perspective and where the counterparty is required to do so (i.e. in cases where it is a FC or NFC+).
 
However, this would be subject to condition that Interactive Brokers uses its own trade valuation for reporting purposes.
 
7. Can EMIR reporting be delegated: EMIR allows either counterparty to delegate reporting to a third-party. If a counterparty or CCP delegates reporting to a third party, it remains ultimately responsible for complying with the reporting obligation. Likewise, the counterparty or CCP must ensure that the third party to whom it has delegated reports correctly. Brokers and dealers do not have a reporting obligation when acting purely in an agency capacity. If a block trade gives rise to multiple transactions, each transaction would have to be reported.
 
FUNDS AND SUB-FUNDS - The obligations under EMIR are on the counterparty which may be the fund or sub-fund. The fund or sub-fund that is the principal to transactions will have to provide details of their classification (FC, NFC+ or NFC-), authorization for delegated reporting and Legal Entity Identifier (“LEI”) application.
 
8. Exemptions under Article 1(4) and 1(5) of EMIR: Articles 1(4) and 1(5) of EMIR exempt certain entities from some or all of the obligations set out in EMIR, depending on their classification. Specifically, exempt entities under Article 1(4) are exempt from all obligations set out in EMIR, while exempt entities under Article 1(5) are exempt from all obligations except the reporting obligation, which continues to apply.
 
9. Entities qualifying under Article 1(4) and 1(5) of EMIR: Article 1(4) initially applied only to EU central banks, Union public bodies involved in the management of public debt and the Bank for International Settlements. Subsequently the
application of the Article 1(4) exemption was extended to include the central banks and debt management offices of the United States and Japan. The Commission has indicated that further foreign central banks and debt management offices may be added in the future if they are satisfied that equivalent regulation is put in place in those jurisdictions. Article 1(5) broadly exempts the following categories of entities:
- Multilateral development banks;
- Non-commercial public sector entities owned and guaranteed by central government; and
- The European Financial Stability Facility and the European Stability Mechanism.
 
10. OTC and Exchange Traded Derivatives: There is no distinction between reporting of exchange traded derivatives (“ETDs”) and OTC contracts within the level 1 regulations, implementing technical standards, or regulatory technical standards of ESMA.
 
The contract is to be identified by using a unique product identifier. In addition, a unique trade identifier will be required for transactions. In the event that a globally agreed system of product identifiers does not materialise, it has been suggested that International Securities Identification numbers (“ISIN”), Alternative Instruments Identifiers (“AII”), or Classification of Financial Instruments Codes (“CFI”) may serve as alternatives.
 
11. Trade repository Interactive Brokers use: Interactive Brokers (U.K.) Limited will use the services of CME ETR, which is part of the CME Group.
 
12. Issuance of Legal Entity Identifiers (“LEI”)
 
All EU counterparties entering into derivative trades will need to have a LEI In order to comply with the reporting obligation. The LEI will be used for the purpose of reporting counterparty data.
 
A LEI is a unique identifier or code attached to a legal person or structure, that will allow for the unambiguous identification of parties to financial transactions.
 
“EMIR”: Further Information on Reporting to Trade Repository Obligations
 
13. Thresholds which determine whether an NFC is an NFC+ or NFC-: Breaching any of the following clearing threshold values will mean classification as an NFC+. Positions must be calculated on a notional, 30-day rolling average basis:
• EUR 1 billion in gross notional value for OTC credit derivative contracts;
• EUR 1 billion in gross notional value for OTC equity derivative contracts;
• EUR 3 billion in gross notional value for OTC interest rate derivative contracts;
• EUR 3 billion in gross notional value for OTC FX derivative contracts; and
• EUR 3 billion in gross notional value for OTC commodity derivative contracts and other OTC derivative contracts not covered above.
 
For the purpose of calculating whether a clearing threshold has been breached, an NFC must aggregate the transactions of all non-financial entities in its group (and determine whether or not those entities are inside or outside the EU) but discount transactions entered into for hedging or treasury purposes. The term “hedging transactions” in this context means transactions objectively measureable as reducing risks directly relating to the commercial activity or treasuring financing activity of the NFC or its group.
 
14. Reporting Of Exposures: FCs and NFC+s must report on:
 
* Mark-to-market or mark-to-model valuations of each contract
* Details of all collateral posted, either on a transaction or portfolio basis (i.e. where collateral is calculated on the basis of net positions resulting from a set of contracts rather than being posted on a transaction by transaction basis)
 
15. Timetable to report to Trade repositories: The reporting start date is 12 February 2014:
 
* New contracts they enter into on or after February 12th, on a trade date +1;
* Positions open from contracts entered into on or after 16 August 2012 and still open on February 12th, 2014 must be reported to a trade repository by February 12th 2014;
* Positions open from contracts entered into before 16th August and still open on February 12th, 2014 must be reported to a trade repository by 13th May 2014;
* Reporting of valuation and collateral must be reported to a trade repository by 12th August 2014;
* Contracts that were either entered before, on or after 16 August 2012 but not open on 12th February 2014 must be reported to a trade repository by February 12th, 2017.
 
16. What must be reported and when: Information must be reported on the counterparties to each trade (counterparty data) and the contracts themselves (common data).
 
There are 26 items that must be reported with regard to counterparty data, and 59 items that must be reported with regard to common data. These items are set out within tables 1 and 2 of the Annex to the ESMA’s Regulatory technical standards on minimum details to be reported to trade repositories.
 
Counterparties and CCPs have to make a report:
 
* when a contract is entered into
* when a contract is modified
* when a contract is terminated
 
A report must be made no later than the working day following the conclusion, modification or termination of the contract.
 
17. What has to be reported and who is responsible for reporting: Reporting applies to both OTC derivatives and exchange traded derivatives. The reporting obligation applies to counterparties to a trade, irrespective of their classification. Please note:
 
* Reporting of valuation and collateral is only required for FCs and NFC+s
* Every trade must be normally be reported by both counterparties.
 
THIS INFORMATION IS GUIDANCE FOR INTERACTIVE BROKERS CLEARED CUSTOMERS ONLY
 
NOTE: THE INFORMATION ABOVE IS NOT INTENDED TO BE A COMPREHENSIVE, EXHAUSTIVE NOR A DEFINITIVE INTERPRETATION OF THE REGULATION, BUT A SUMMARY OF ESMA’S EMIR REGULATION AND RESULTING TRADE REPOSITORY REPORTING OBLIGATIONS.

 

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