Overview of T+2 Settlement

Introduction

Effective September 5, 2017, the standard settlement period for securities traded on U.S. and Canadian exchanges will be reduced from 3 business days (T+3) to 2 business days (T+2). Background information regarding this change, its projected impact and a list of FAQs are outlined below.
 
Background
Settlement is a post-trade process whereby legal ownership of securities is transferred from the seller to the purchaser in exchange for payment.  This process is facilitated via a central depository which maintains security ownership records and a clearinghouse which processes the exchange of funds and instructs the depository to transfer ownership of the securities. For U.S. securities, the Depository Trust Company (DTC) operates as the primary depository and the National Securities Clearing Corporation (NSCC), the clearinghouse. The Canadian Depository for Securities (CDS) performs these functions for Canadian securities. The current settlement cycle for both U.S. and Canadian securities is 3 business days following the trade date.
 
Why is the settlement period changing?
Operational efficiencies afforded by registering securities ownership in an electronic form and the ease and low cost by which clients may transfer funds electronically are critical factors enabling the shortening of the settlement cycle. The settlement cycle was last reduced from 5 business days to 3 in 1995 and transactions involving the delivery of physical certificates or payment via check continue to decline.
 
Shortening the settlement cycle is expected to yield the following benefits for the industry and its participants:
 
  • Lessens risk to the financial system – the likelihood that the price of a given security will change increases over time and reducing the settlement day lessens exposure to credit risk due to non-payment or non-delivery of that security. By reducing the notional value of outstanding obligations in the settlement pipeline, the financial sector is better protected from the potential systemic consequences of serious market disruptions. 
  • Cash deployment efficiencies – clients who maintain “Cash” type accounts are subject to restrictions which may preclude them from trading with unsettled funds (i.e., “Free-Riding” or buying and selling a security without paying for it). With T+2, funds from the sale of a security will now be available 1 business day earlier, thereby providing quicker access to funds and the ability to redeploy them sooner for subsequent purchases. 
  • Enhanced global settlement harmonization - the transition to a T+2 settlement cycle will align the U.S. and Canadian markets with other major international markets in Europe and Asia that currently operate in a T+2 environment.
 
What products are impacted by this change?
U.S. and Canadian stocks, ETFs, ADRs, corporate bonds, municipal bonds, CFDs, and unit investment trusts (UITs)
 
How will this change impact my account?
Dividends & corporate actions – securities must be purchased prior to the Ex-Date for entitlement to dividends or other rights associated with the security.    Under the current T+3 settlement cycle, the Ex-Date is typically 2 business days prior to the Record Date and this relationship will be reduced to 1 business day under T+2.
 
Short sale transactions – brokers are required under SEC Rule 204 to close out short sales if unable to borrow securities and make delivery at settlement. Currently, close out must take place by no later than the beginning of regular trading hours on T+4.  With the shortening of the settlement cycle to T+2, close out will be moved up 1 business day to T+3.
 
T+2 Order Destination – IB currently offers an order destination (TPLUS2) which allows covered call writers to purchase and deliver, upon assignment, shares having a more favorable cost basis. This T+2 order, which reduces the possibility of triggering an unwanted capital gains tax, will be amended to T+1 delivery in order to provide the same benefits.  Note that this T+2 order destination will be disabled prior to September 5, 2017 and the T+1 order destination enabled shortly after that date (i.e., there will be a transition period during which this accelerated settlement order destination will not be offered).
 
Option Exercise – The delivery period for stock and payment of cash resulting from the exercise of stock options will be reduced from 3 business days to 2.
 
Interest paid on credit balances – interest computations are based upon settled cash balances. If you purchase stock and have sufficient cash to pay for the purchase in full (i.e., no margin loan), the proceeds necessary to pay for that stock are currently eligible to earn interest up until T+3 at which point they are remitted to the clearinghouse. That interest earning period will be reduced by 1 business day under T+2. Note, however, that when that security is sold the funds settle to your account 1 business day earlier under T+2 and are then eligible to earn interest. 
 
Interest charged on debit balances – interest computations are based upon settled cash balances. If you purchase stock and borrow funds to pay for the purchase (i.e., a margin loan), interest is not charged on the loan until payment is remitted to the clearinghouse on T+3. That loan date will start 1 business day earlier under T+2. Note, however, that when that security is sold, the proceeds are credited to your account and will partially or fully pay of the loan 1 business day earlier under T+2.   
 
FAQs

Will the settlement for purchases and sales of options, futures or futures options contracts change?

No. These products currently settle on T+1 and that settlement cycle will not change.

 
Will the settlement for purchases and sales of mutual funds change?
No. All mutual funds offered by IB currently settle on T+1 and that settlement cycle will not change.
 
Will this change have any impact upon the cash or assets required to initiate an order?
No. All orders are currently pre-checked prior to submission to ensure that the account will be compliant were the order to execute. In the cash of cash accounts, that means that the account must have the necessary settled cash on hand to meet the settlement regardless of T+3 or T+2.  Similarly, in the case of margin accounts, the account must have the necessary Excess Equity to remain margin compliant. This safeguard will not change under T+2.
 
Will this change have any impact upon the timeframe by which securities are transferred via ACATS or ATON?
No. Transfer processes will not be impacted by the move from T+3 to T+2.

U.S. Microcap Stock Restrictions

Introduction
To comply with regulations regarding the sale of unregistered securities and to minimize the manual processing associated with trading shares that are not publicly quoted, IBKR imposes certain restrictions on U.S. Microcap Stocks. A list of those restrictions, along with other FAQs relating to this topic are provided below. 

Microcap Restrictions

  • IBKR will only accept transfers of U.S. Microcap stocks from Eligible Clients. Eligible Clients include accounts that: (1) maintain equity (pre or post-transfer) of at least $5 million or, clients of financial advisors with aggregate assets under management of at least $20 million; and (2) have less than half of their equity in U.S. Microcap stocks.
  • IBKR will only accept transfers1 of blocks of U.S. Microcap stocks where the Eligible Client can confirm the shares were purchased on the open market or registered with the SEC;
  • IBKR will not accept transfers1 of or opening orders for U.S. Microcap Stocks designated by OTC as Caveat Emptor or Grey Market from any client. Clients with existing positions in these stocks may close the positions;
  • Execution-only clients (i.e., execute trades through IBKR, but clear those trades elsewhere) may not trade U.S. Microcap Stocks within their IBKR account. (IBKR may make exceptions for U.S.-registered brokers);


Microcap FAQs

What is a U.S. Microcap Stock?
The term “Microcap Stock” refers to shares (1) traded over the counter or (2) that are listed on Nasdaq and NYSE American that have a market capitalization of between $50 million to $300 million and are trading at or below $5. For purposes of this policy, the term Microcap Stock will include the shares of U.S. public companies which have a market capitalization at or below $50 million, which are sometimes referred to as nanocap stocks or trade on a market generally associated with Microcap Stocks.

As Microcap Stocks are often low-priced, they are commonly referred to as penny stocks. IBKR may make exceptions, including for stocks traded at low prices that recently had a greater market cap. In addition, IBKR will not consider ADRs on non-US companies to be Micro-Cap stocks.


Where do Microcap Stocks trade?
Microcap Stocks typically trade in the OTC market, rather than on a national securities exchange. They are often electronically quoted by market makers on OTC systems such as the OTC Bulletin Board (OTCBB) and the markets administered by the OTC Markets Group (e.g., OTCQX, OTCQB & Pink). Also included in this category are stocks which may not be publicly quoted and which are designated as Caveat Emptor, Other OTC or Grey Market.
In addition, U.S. regulators also consider stocks listed on Nasdaq or NYSE American trading at or below $5 with a market capitalization at or less than $300 million to be Microcap Stocks.

What happens if IBKR receives a transfer from an Eligible Client where one or more of the positions transferred is a Microcap Stock?
If IBKR receives a transfer containing a block of a Microcap stock, IBKR reserves the right to restrict the sale of any Microcap position(s) included in the transfer unless the Eligible Client provides appropriate documentation establishing that the shares were either purchased on the open market (i.e., on a public exchange through another broker) or were registered with the SEC pursuant to an S-1 or similar registration statement.

Eligible Clients can prove that shares were purchased on the open market by providing a brokerage statement or trade confirm from a reputable broker reflecting the purchase of the shares on a public exchange. Eligible Clients can establish that the shares are registered by providing the SEC (Edgar system) File number under which their shares were registered by the company (and any documents necessary to confirm the shares are the ones listed in the registration statement).

NOTE: All customers are free to transfer out any shares we have restricted at any time.
 

What restrictions will IBKR apply to Prime accounts?
Clients whose activities include Prime services are considered Eligible Clients solely for the purposes of those trades which IBKR has agreed to accept from its executing brokers. However, while Prime accounts may clear U.S. Microcap Stocks at IBKR, those shares will be restricted until such time IBKR confirms that the shares are eligible for re-sale under the procedures discussed above.  To remove the restriction for shares purchased on the open market, please provide an official Account Statement or Trade Confirmation from the executing broker or have the executing broker provide a signed letter, on company letterhead, showing the IBKR account name and number, stating that the shares were purchased in the open market, along with the details of the executions (date, time, quantity, symbol, price, and exchange).  Or if the shares were acquired through an offering the letter must provide documents or links to the relevant registration statement and state that the shares were part of it.

To summarize: Sell Long trades will be accepted if the long position is no longer restricted.  Sell Short trades will be accepted.  Buy Long trades will be accepted and the position will be restricted until Compliance is provided with sufficient information to remove the restriction.  Buy Cover trades and intraday round trip trades will not be accepted.

 

What happens if a stock you purchase gets reclassified as Grey Market or Caveat Emptor?
If you purchase a stock in your IBKR account that at a later date becomes classified as a Caveat Emptor or Grey Market stock, you will be allowed to maintain, close or transfer the position but will not be able to increase your position.

 

Where can I find a list of stocks that IBKR has designated as U.S. Microcaps?

A list of stocks designated as U.S. Microcaps by IBKR is available via the following link: www.ibkr.com/download/us_microcaps.csv

Note that this list is updated daily.

Where can I find additional information on Microcap Stocks?
Additional information on Microcap Stocks, including risks associated with such stocks may be found on the SEC website: https://www.sec.gov/reportspubs/investor-publications/investorpubsmicrocapstockhtm.html

For information regarding Canadian stock transfer restrictions, see KB3118
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1This includes transfers by any method (e.g., ACATS, DWAC, FOP), conversion of Canadian listings to their U.S. equivalent via “Southbound” transfer, transfers to cover existing short positions, IB Prime customers executing with other brokers and clearing to IBKR, etc.

 

IEX Discretionary Peg Order

Background: 

IEX offers a Discretionary Peg™ (D-Peg™) order type which is a non-displayed order that is priced at either the National Best Bid (NBB for buys) or National Best Offer (NBO for sells). D-Peg™ orders passively rest on the book while seeking to access liquidity at a more aggressive price up to Midpoint of the NBBO, except when IEX determines that the quote is transitioning to less aggressive price

D-Peg™ combines elements of Midpoint Peg, Primary Peg, and traditional discretionary order types.
 
Information about slow and predictable changes in the NBBO are detected in IEX's Crumbling Quote Indicator and provides D-Peg™ orders with an instruction to stop seeking access to liquidity at a more aggressive price until the quote returns to a stable state.

 

How to Place a D-Peg Order

Please note, the IEX D-Peg order type is only available via the TWS version 961 and above. Instructions for entering this order type are outlined below:

Step 1

Enter a symbol and choose a directed quote, selecting IEX as the destination. Right click on the data line and select Trade followed by Order Ticket to open the Order Ticket window.

 

Step 2

Select the REL order type from the Order Type drop down menu.

 

Step 3

Click on the Miscellaneous tab (Misc.) and at the bottom there will be a checkbox for "Discretionary up to limit". Check this box. The price that you set in the Limit Price field will be used at the discretionary price on the order.

 

 

Step 4 

Hit Preview to view the Order Preview window.

 

 

For additional information concerning this order type, please review the following exchange website link: https://www.iextrading.com/trading/dpeg/

 

 

Presentación general de los CFD sobre acciones emitidos por IB

En este artículo se ofrece una presentación general sobre los contratos por diferencias (CFD) basados en acciones emitidos por IBKR.

Para más información sobre CFD sobre índices de IBKR, haga clic aquí. Haga clic aquí para obtener más información sobre CFD sobre fórex.

Los temas que se cubren son los siguientes:

I.    Definición de CFD
II.   Comparación entre CFD y acciones subyacentes
III.  Costes y consideraciones de margen
IV.  Ejemplo
V.   Recursos para CFD
VI.  Preguntas frecuentes

 

Advertencia de riesgo

Los CFD son instrumentos complejos y están asociados a un riesgo elevado de perder dinero rápidamente debido al apalancamiento.

El 67 % de las cuentas de inversores minoristas pierden dinero en la comercialización con CFD con IBKR (UK).

Debe considerar si entiende el funcionamiento de los CFD y si puede permitirse asumir un riesgo elevado de perder su dinero.

Normas AEMV para CFD (solo para clientes minoristas)

La Asociación Europea de Valores y Mercados (AEVM) ha implementado una nueva normativa sobre los CFD, la cual entrará en vigor el 1 de agosto de 2018.

En la normativa se incluye lo siguiente: 1) límites de apalancamiento en la apertura de una posición CFD; 2) una norma de cierre de margen sobre una base por cuenta; y 3) protección de saldo negativo sobre una base por cuenta.

La decisión de la AEVM solo es aplicable a los clientes minoristas. Los clientes profesionales no se ven afectados.

Consulte la normativa sobre CFD de la AEVM en IBKR para obtener más información.

I.  Definición de CFD sobre  acciones

Los CFD de IBKR son contratos extrabursátiles que ofrecen el rendimiento de la acción subyacente, incluidos dividendos y acciones corporativas (leer más sobre acciones corporativas para CFD).

En otras palabras, es un acuerdo entre el comprador (usted) e IBKR para intercambiar la diferencia entre el valor actual de una acción y su valor en un momento futuro. Si mantiene una posición larga y la diferencia es positiva, IBKR le pagará. Si es negativa, usted pagará a IBKR.

Los CFD sobre acciones de IBKR se operan a través de su cuenta de margen. Por tanto, puede introducir tanto posiciones largas como posiciones cortas apalancadas. El precio del CFD es el precio cotizado en el mercado de la acción subyacente. De hecho, las cotizaciones de CFD de IBKR son idénticas a las cotizaciones con enrutado smart para acciones que figuran en la TWS e IB ofrece acceso directo al mercado (DMA). De forma parecida a las acciones, sus órdenes no negociables (por ej. limitadas) tienen una cobertura subyacente directamente representada en el libro de los mercados en los que opera.  Esto también significa que usted puede introducir órdenes para comprar el CFD al bid del subyacente y vender al ask.

Para comparar el modelo transparente de CFD de IBKR con otros disponibles en el mercado, consulte nuestra página Resumen general de modelos de mercado de CFD.

IBKR actualmente ofrece unos 7 100 CFD sobre acciones que cubren los principales mercados en Estados Unidos, Europa y Asia. Los constituyentes de los índices principales abajo indicados están disponibles como CFD sobre acciones de IBKR. IBKR también ofrece negociación en acciones de pequeña capitalización líquida. Estas acciones con capitalización de mercado ajustada al capital flotante de, al menos, 500 millones de dólares estadounidenses y el valor de negociación diario promedio de, al menos, 600,000 dólares estadounidenses.  Consulte la lista de productos de CFD para obtener más información. Se añadirán más países en el futuro.

Estados Unidos S&P 500, DJA, Nasdaq 100, S&P 400 (Mid Cap), capitalización pequeña líquida
Reino Unido FTSE 350 + capitalización pequeña líquida (incl. IOB)
Alemania Dax, MDax, TecDax + Capitalización pequeña líquida
Suiza Porción suiza de STOXX Europe 600 (48 acciones) + capitalización líquida pequeña
Francia CAC capitalización elevada, CAC capitalización media + capitalización pequeña líquida
Países Bajos AEX, AMS capitalización media + capitalización pequeña líquida
Bélgica BEL 20, BEL capitalización media + capitalización pequeña líquida
España IBEX 35 + capitalización pequeña líquida
Portugal PSI 20
Suecia OMX Stockholm 30 + capitalización pequeña líquida
Finlandia OMX Helsinki 25 + capitalización pequeña líquida
Dinamarca OMX Copenhagen 30 + capitalización pequeña líquida
Noruega OBX
Chequia PX
Japón Nikkei 225 + capitalización pequeña líquida
Hong Kong HSI + capitalización pequeña líquida
Australia ASX 200 + capitalización pequeña líquida
Singapur* STI + capitalización pequeña líquida
Sudáfrica Top 40 + capitalización pequeña líquida

 *no disponible para residentes de Singapur

II.   Comparación entre CFD y acciones subyacentes

Según sus objetivos y estilo de negociación, los CFD ofrecen varias ventajas comparados con las acciones, pero también tienen ciertas desventajas:
 
BENEFITS of IBKR CFDs DRAWBACKS of IBKR CFDs
No hay impuesto de timbre o impuesto de transacción financiera (Reino Unido, Francia, Bélgica) No hay derechos de propiedad
Comisiones y tasas de margen generalmente más bajas que las acciones Las acciones corporativas complejas no serán siempre repetibles
Las comisiones de los tratados de impuestos para dividendos sin necesidad de reclamación. Los impuestos sobre ganancias pueden ser diferentes a los de las acciones (consulte a su asesor fiscal).
Exenciones de la normativa de negociación diaria  

III.  Costes y consideraciones de margen

Los CFD de IBKR pueden ser un modo aún más eficaz de operar en los mercados de acciones europeos que la competitiva oferta de acciones de IB.

Los CFD de IBKR de IB tienen bajas comisiones comparados con las acciones, y presentan los mismos spreads de baja financiación:

EUROPA   CFD ACCIONES
Comisiones GBP 0.05 % 6.00 GBP + 0.05%*
EUR 0.05 % 0.10 %
Financiación** Referente +/- 1.50 % 1.50 %

*por orden + 0.05% de exceso por encima de 50,000 GBP
**Financiación en CFD sobre el valor total de la posición, financiación de acciones sobre cantidad prestada

Cuanto más opera, más bajas son las comisiones de los CFD; tan bajas como un 0.02%. Las tasas de financiación se reducen para posiciones grandes, tan bajas como el 0.5%.  Por favor, consulte las Comisiones de CFD y Tasas de financiación de CFD para más detalles.

Además, los CFD tienen requisitos de margen más bajos que las acciones. Los clientes minoristas están sujetos a requisitos de margen adicionales ordenados por la AEVM, el regulador europeo. Por favor, consulte la implementación de normas de CFD de la AEVM en IBKR para más detalles.

  CFD ACCIONES
  Todo Estándar Margen de Cartera
Requisito de margen de mantenimiento*

10 %

25 % - 50 % 15 %

*Margen típico para empresas blue-chips. Los clientes minoristas están sujetos a un margen inicial mínimo del 20%. Margen de mantenimiento intradía estándar del 25% para acciones, 50% trasnoche.  Se muestra el margen de cartera como margen de mantenimiento (incl. trasnoche). Los elementos más volátiles están sujetos a requisitos más altos.

Consulte los requisitos de margen de CFD para obtener más información.


IV.  Ejemplo (cliente profesional)

Veamos un ejemplo La cotización de Unilever’s Amsterdam ha generado el 3.2% durante el mes anterior (20 días operativos desde el 14 de mayo de 2012) y usted cree que seguirá funcionando bien. Usted desea crear una exposición de 200,000 EUR y mantenerla durante 5 días. Realiza 10 operaciones para crear y 10 operaciones para contrarrestar. Sus costes directos serían los siguientes:

ACCIONES

  CFD ACCIONES
Posición de 200,000 EUR   Estándar Margen de Cartera
Requisito de margen 20,000 100,000 30,000
Comisión (entrada y salida) 200.00 400.00 400.00
Tasas de interés (simplificada) 1.50 % 1.50 % 1.50 %
Cantidad financiada 200,000 100,000 170,000
Días financiados  5 5 5
Gastos de interés (1.5% tasa simplificada) 41.67 20.83 35.42
Coste directo total (Comisión + interés) 241.67 420.83 435.42
Diferencia de coste   74% más alto 80% más alto

Nota: los gastos de interés para CFD se calculan para toda la posición; para las acciones, el interés se calcula sobre la cantidad prestada. Las tasas aplicables son las mismas tanto para acciones como para CFD.

 

Pero supongamos que usted solo tiene 20,000 EUR disponibles para financiar el margen. Si Unilever continúa rindiendo como lo ha hecho durante el mes pasado, sus beneficios potenciales se compararían como siguen:  

RECOMPENSA APALANCADA CFD ACCIONES
Margen disponible 20,000 20,000 20,000
Total invertido 200,000 40,000 133,333
Rendimiento bruto (5 días) 1,600 320 1,066.66
Comisiones 200.00 80.00 266.67
Gastos de interés (1.5% tasa simplificada) 41.67 4.17 23.61
Coste directo total (Comisiones + interés) 241.67 84.17 290.28
Rendimiento neto (rentabilidad bruta menos costes directos) 1,358.33 235.83 776.39
Rentabilidad sobre cantidad de inversión de margen 0.07 0.01 0.04
Diferencia   83% menos ganancias 43% menos ganancias

 

RIESGO DE APALANCAMIENTO CFD ACCIONES
Margen disponible 20,000 20,000 20,000
Total invertido 200,000 40,000 133,333
Rendimiento bruto (5 días) -1,600 -320 -1,066.66
Comisiones 200.00 80.00 266.67
Gastos de interés (1.5% tasa simplificada) 41.67 4.17 23.61
Coste directo total (Comisiones + interés) 241.67 84.17 290.28
Rendimiento neto (rentabilidad bruta menos costes directos) -1,841.67 -404.17 -1,356.94
Diferencia   78% menos pérdidas 26% menos pérdidas

 

V.   Recursos para CFD

A continuación encontrará varios enlaces con más información sobre la oferta de CFD de IBKR:

Especificaciones de contratos de CFD

Productos de CFD

Comisiones para CFD

Comisiones de financiación para CFD

Requisitos de margen de CFD

Acciones corporativas CFD

También está disponible el siguiente vídeo:

Cómo realizar una operación en CFD en la Trader Workstation

 

VI.  Preguntas frecuentes

¿Qué acciones hay disponibles como CFD?

Acciones de capitalización media y elevada en Estados Unidos, Europa Occidental, países nórdicos y Japón. Las acciones de capitalización pequeña líquida también están disponibles en muchos mercados. Si desea más detalles, consulte los productos de CFD. En un futuro próximo se añadirán más países.

 

¿Tiene CFD sobre índices de acciones y fórex?

Sí. Consulte las páginas CFD sobre índices de IB - Datos y preguntas frecuentes y CFD sobre fórex - Datos y preguntas frecuentes.

 

Determinación de las cotizaciones de los CFD sobre acciones

Las cotizaciones de CFD de IBKR son idénticas a las cotizaciones con enrutado smart para la acción subyacente. IBKR no amplía el diferencial o mantiene posiciones contra usted. Presentación de los modelos de mercado de CFD para obtener más información.

 

¿Puedo ver mis órdenes limitadas reflejadas en el mercado?

Sí. IBKR ofrece acceso directo al mercado (DMA) a través de los cuales sus órdenes no comercializables tienen una cobertura subyacente representada directamente en el libro de profundidad de los mercados en los que opera. Esto también significa que usted puede introducir órdenes para comprar el CFD al bid del subyacente y vender al ask. Además, también podría recibir mejoras de precio si la orden de otro cliente se cruza con la suya a un mejor precio que esté disponible en mercados públicos.

 

¿Cómo se determinan los márgenes para CFD sobre acciones?

IBKR establece requisitos de margen basados en el riesgo, según la volatilidad histórica observada de la acción subyacente. El margen mínimo es 10%. La mayoría de los CFD de IB tienen un margen con esta tasa, cosa que generalmente causa que los CFD sean más eficientes que las acciones subyacentes.  Los clientes minoristas están sujetos a requisitos de margen adicionales ordenados por la AEVM, el regulador

europeo. Consulte la implementación de normas de CFD de la AEVM en IBKR para obtener más información. No hay compensaciones de cartera entre posiciones en CFD individuales o entre CFD y exposiciones a la acción subyacente. Las posiciones concentradas y las posiciones muy grandes podrían estar sujetas a márgenes adicionales. Consulte los requisitos de margen de CFD para obtener más información.

 

¿Los CFD sobre acciones están sujetos a recompras forzosas?

Sí. En el caso de que la acción subyacente se vuelva difícil o imposible de prestar, el titular de la posición corta en CFD estará sujeto a recompra.

 

¿Cómo se gestionan los dividendos y acciones corporativas?

IBKR generalmente reflejará el efecto económico de la acción corporativa para titulares de CFD como si hubieran mantenido el valor subyacente. Los dividendos se reflejan como ajustes en efectivo, mientras que otras acciones pueden reflejarse como ajustes en efectivo o de posiciones o ambas. Por ejemplo, cuando la acción corporativa tiene como resultado un cambio en el número de acciones (por ejemplo, desdoblamiento o reagrupamiento de acciones), el número de CFD se ajustará según esto. Cuando la acción corporativa tenga como resultado una nueva entidad con participaciones cotizadas e IBKR decida ofrecerlas como CFD, las nuevas posiciones largas y cortas se crearán en la cantidad adecuada. Consulte las acciones corporativas de CFD para obtener más información.

*En algunos casos los CFD no se pueden ajustar a una acción corporativa compleja, como sería el caso de ciertas fusiones. En estos casos, IB podría terminar el CFD antes de la fecha-ex.

 

¿Quién puede negociar CFD de IBKR?

Todos los clientes pueden operar con CFD de IBKR excepto los residentes de los Estados Unidos, Canadá y Hong Kong. Los residentes de Singapur pueden operar con CFD de IBKR, excepto los CFD basados en acciones cotizadas en Singapur. No se aplica ninguna excepción basada en el tipo de inversor para las exclusiones según residencia.

 

¿Qué necesito para empezar a operar en CFD con IBKR?

Debe configurar sus permisos de negociación para CFD en Gestión de Cuenta y aceptar los avisos legales de negociación relevantes. Si su cuenta es con LLC, IBKR configurará un nuevo segmento de cuenta (identificado con su número de cuenta existente más el sufijo “F”). Una vez confirmada la configuración, podrá comenzar a negociar. No necesita depositar fondos en la cuenta-F por separado; los fondos se transferirán de forma automática para cumplir los requisitos de margen de CFD de su cuenta principal.  

¿Hay algún requisito para datos de mercado?

Los datos de mercado para los CFD sobre acciones de IB son los datos de mercado para las acciones subyacentes. Por lo tanto, es necesario tener los permisos de datos de mercado para los mercados relevantes. Si ya ha configurado sus permisos de datos de mercado para un mercado para la negociación de acciones, no necesita hacer nada. Si quiere operar en CFD en un mercado para el que no tiene permisos de datos de mercado, puede establecer los permisos del mismo modo en que lo haría si planificara operar las acciones subyacentes.

 

¿Cómo se reflejan en mis extractos las operaciones en CFD y mis posiciones?

Si tiene una cuenta con IBLLC, sus posiciones en CFD se mantendrán en un segmento de cuenta separado, identificado con su número de cuenta primario con el sufijo “F”. Puede elegir ver el extracto de actividad para el segmento F por separado o consolidado para su cuenta principal. Puede realizar la selección en la ventana de extracto de Gestión de Cuenta. Para otras cuentas, los CFD se muestran normalmente en su extracto de cuenta junto con otros productos de negociación.

 

¿Puedo transferir las posiciones en CFD desde otro bróker?

IBKR no realiza transferencias de posiciones de CFD en estos momentos.

 

¿Hay gráficos disponibles para CFD sobre acciones?

Sí.

 ¿Qué protecciones de cuenta se aplican cuando se opera con CFD de IBKR?

Los CFD son contratos con IB UK como su contraparte, y no se negocian en un mercado regulado y no se compensan con una cámara de compensación central. Como IB UK es la contraparte de sus operaciones en CFD, usted se expone a los riesgos comerciales y financieros, incluido el riesgo de crédito, asociados con la relación con IB UK. Tenga en cuenta que todos los fondos de los clientes están siempre totalmente segregados, incluidos los clientes institucionales. IB UK es un participante en el esquema de compensación de servicios financieros del Reino Unido (Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS)). IB UK no es miembro de la Securities Investor Protection Corporation (“SIPC”). Por favor, consulte la declaración de riesgo de CFD de IB UK para más detalles sobre los riesgos asociados con la negociación de CFD.

 

¿Se puede operar con CFD con cualquier tipo de cuenta IBKR? 

Todas las cuentas de margen son elegibles para negociación CFD. Las cuentas en efectivo o SIPP no lo son.

 

¿Cuál es la posición máxima que puedo tener en un CFD específico?

No hay un límite preestablecido. Recuerde que las posiciones más elevadas pueden estar sujetas a requisitos aumentados de margen. Si desea más detalles, consulte los requisitos de margen de CFD.

 

¿Puedo negociar con CFD por teléfono?

No. En casos excepcionales, podríamos aceptar procesar las órdenes de cierre por teléfono, pero nunca las órdenes de apertura.

 

SEC Tick Size Pilot Program

Background

Effective October 3, 2016, securities exchanges registered with the SEC will operate a Tick Size Pilot Program ("Pilot") intended to determine what impact, if any, widening of the minimum price change (i.e., tick size) will have on the trading, liquidity, and market quality of small cap stocks.  The Pilot will last for 2 years and it will include approximately 1,200 securities having a market capitalization of $3 billion or less, average daily trading volume of 1 million shares or less, and a volume weighted average price of at least $2.00.

For purposes of the Pilot, these securities will be organized into groups that will determine a minimum tick size for both quote display and trading purposes. For example, Test Group 1 will consist of securities to be quoted in $0.05 increments and traded in $0.01 increments and Test Group 2 will include securities both quoted and traded in $0.05 increments.  Test Group 3 will include also include securities both quoted and traded in $0.05 increments, but subject to Trade-at rules (more fully explained in the Rule). In addition, there will be a Control Group of securities that will continue to be quoted and traded in increments of $0.01. Details as to the Pilot and securities groupings are available on the FINRA website.

 

Impact to IB Account Holders 

In order to comply with the SEC Rules associated with this Pilot, IB will change the way that it accepts orders in stocks included in the Pilot.  Specifically, starting October 3, 2016 and in accordance with the phase-in schedule, IB will reject the following orders associated with Pilot Securities assigned to Test Groups:

  • Limit orders having an explicit limit that is not entered in an increment of $0.05;
  • Stop or Stop Limit orders having an explicit limit that is not entered in an increment of $0.05; and
     
  • Orders having a price offset that is not entered in an increment of $0.05.  Note that this does not apply to offsets which are percentage based and which therefore allow IB to calculate the permissible nickel increment

 Clients submitting orders via the trading platform that are subject to rejection will receive the following pop-up message:

 

 The following order types will continue to be accepted for Pilot Program Securities:

  • Market orders;
  • Benchmark orders having no impermissible offsets (e.g., VWAP, TVWAP);
  • Pegged orders having no impermissible offsets ;
  • Retail Price Improvement Orders routed to the NASDAQ-BX and NYSE as follows:
    - Test Group 1 in .001

      - Test Group 2 and 3 in .005

     
 

Other Items of Note

  • GTC limit and stop orders entered prior to the start of the Pilot will be adjusted as allowed (e.g., a buy limit order at $5.01 will be adjusted to $5.00 and a sell limit at $5.01 adjusted to $5.05).
  • Clients generating orders via third-party software (e.g., signal provider), order management system, computer to computer interfaces (CTCI) or through the API, should contact their vendor or review their systems to ensure that all systems recognize the Pilot restrictions.
  • Incoming orders to IB that are marked with TSP exception codes from other Broker Dealers will not be acted upon by IB. For example, IB will not accept incoming orders marked with the Retail Investor Order or Trade-At ISO exception codes.
  • The SEC order associated with this Pilot is available via the following link: https://www.sec.gov/rules/sro/nms/2015/34-74892-exa.pdf
  • For a list of Pilot Program related FAQs, please see KB2750

 

Please note that the contents of this article are subject to revision as further regulatory guidance or changes to the Pilot Program are issued.

 

 

Allocation of Partial Fills

Title:

How are executions allocated when an order receives a partial fill because an insufficient quantity is available to complete the allocation of shares/contracts to sub-accounts?

 

Overview:

From time-to-time, one may experience an allocation order which is partially executed and is canceled prior to being completed (i.e. market closes, contract expires, halts due to news, prices move in an unfavorable direction, etc.). In such cases, IB determines which customers (who were originally included in the order group and/or profile) will receive the executed shares/contracts. The methodology used by IB to impartially determine who receives the shares/contacts in the event of a partial fill is described in this article.

 

Background:

Before placing an order CTAs and FAs are given the ability to predetermine the method by which an execution is to be allocated amongst client accounts. They can do so by first creating a group (i.e. ratio/percentage) or profile (i.e. specific amount) wherein a distinct number of shares/contracts are specified per client account (i.e. pre-trade allocation). These amounts can be prearranged based on certain account values including the clients’ Net Liquidation Total, Available Equity, etc., or indicated prior to the order execution using Ratios, Percentages, etc. Each group and/or profile is generally created with the assumption that the order will be executed in full. However, as we will see, this is not always the case. Therefore, we are providing examples that describe and demonstrate the process used to allocate partial executions with pre-defined groups and/or profiles and how the allocations are determined.

Here is the list of allocation methods with brief descriptions about how they work.

·         AvailableEquity
Use sub account’ available equality value as ratio. 

·         NetLiq
Use subaccount’ net liquidation value as ratio

·         EqualQuantity
Same ratio for each account

·         PctChange1:Portion of the allocation logic is in Trader Workstation (the initial calculation of the desired quantities per account).

·         Profile

The ratio is prescribed by the user

·         Inline Profile

The ratio is prescribed by the user.

·         Model1:
Roughly speaking, we use each account NLV in the model as the desired ratio. It is possible to dynamically add (invest) or remove (divest) accounts to/from a model, which can change allocation of the existing orders.

 

 

 

Basic Examples:

Details:

CTA/FA has 3-clients with a predefined profile titled “XYZ commodities” for orders of 50 contracts which (upon execution) are allocated as follows:

Account (A) = 25 contracts

Account (B) = 15 contracts

Account (C) = 10 contracts

 

Example #1:

CTA/FA creates a DAY order to buy 50 Sept 2016 XYZ future contracts and specifies “XYZ commodities” as the predefined allocation profile. Upon transmission at 10 am (ET) the order begins to execute2but in very small portions and over a very long period of time. At 2 pm (ET) the order is canceled prior to being executed in full. As a result, only a portion of the order is filled (i.e., 7 of the 50 contracts are filled or 14%). For each account the system initially allocates by rounding fractional amounts down to whole numbers:

 

Account (A) = 14% of 25 = 3.5 rounded down to 3

Account (B) = 14% of 15 = 2.1 rounded down to 2

Account (C) = 14% of 10 = 1.4 rounded down to 1

 

To Summarize:

A: initially receives 3 contracts, which is 3/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.12)

B: initially receives 2 contracts, which is 2/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.134)

C: initially receives 1 contract, which is 1/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.10)

 

The system then allocates the next (and final) contract to an account with the smallest ratio (i.e. Account C which currently has a ratio of 0.10).

A: final allocation of 3 contracts, which is 3/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.12)

B: final allocation of 2 contracts, which is 2/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.134)

C: final allocation of 2 contract, which is 2/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.20)

The execution(s) received have now been allocated in full.

 

Example #2:

CTA/FA creates a DAY order to buy 50 Sept 2016 XYZ future contracts and specifies “XYZ commodities” as the predefined allocation profile. Upon transmission at 11 am (ET) the order begins to be filled3 but in very small portions and over a very long period of time. At 1 pm (ET) the order is canceled prior being executed in full. As a result, only a portion of the order is executed (i.e., 5 of the 50 contracts are filled or 10%).For each account, the system initially allocates by rounding fractional amounts down to whole numbers:

 

Account (A) = 10% of 25 = 2.5 rounded down to 2

Account (B) = 10% of 15 = 1.5 rounded down to 1

Account (C) = 10% of 10 = 1 (no rounding necessary)

 

To Summarize:

A: initially receives 2 contracts, which is 2/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.08)

B: initially receives 1 contract, which is 1/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.067)

C: initially receives 1 contract, which is 1/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.10)

The system then allocates the next (and final) contract to an account with the smallest ratio (i.e. to Account B which currently has a ratio of 0.067).

A: final allocation of 2 contracts, which is 2/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.08)

B: final allocation of 2 contracts, which is 2/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.134)

C: final allocation of 1 contract, which is 1/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.10)

 

The execution(s) received have now been allocated in full.

Example #3:

CTA/FA creates a DAY order to buy 50 Sept 2016 XYZ future contracts and specifies “XYZ commodities” as the predefined allocation profile. Upon transmission at 11 am (ET) the order begins to be executed2  but in very small portions and over a very long period of time. At 12 pm (ET) the order is canceled prior to being executed in full. As a result, only a portion of the order is filled (i.e., 3 of the 50 contracts are filled or 6%). Normally the system initially allocates by rounding fractional amounts down to whole numbers, however for a fill size of less than 4 shares/contracts, IB first allocates based on the following random allocation methodology.

 

In this case, since the fill size is 3, we skip the rounding fractional amounts down.

 

For the first share/contract, all A, B and C have the same initial fill ratio and fill quantity, so we randomly pick an account and allocate this share/contract. The system randomly chose account A for allocation of the first share/contract.

 

To Summarize3:

A: initially receives 1 contract, which is 1/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.04)

B: initially receives 0 contracts, which is 0/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.00)

C: initially receives 0 contracts, which is 0/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.00)

 

Next, the system will perform a random allocation amongst the remaining accounts (in this case accounts B & C, each with an equal probability) to determine who will receive the next share/contract.

 

The system randomly chose account B for allocation of the second share/contract.

A: 1 contract, which is 1/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.04)

B: 1 contract, which is 1/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.067)

C: 0 contracts, which is 0/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.00)

 

The system then allocates the final [3] share/contract to an account(s) with the smallest ratio (i.e. Account C which currently has a ratio of 0.00).

A: final allocation of 1 contract, which is 1/25 of desired (fill ratio = 0.04)

B: final allocation of 1 contract, which is 1/15 of desired (fill ratio = 0.067)

C: final allocation of 1 contract, which is 1/10 of desired (fill ratio = 0.10)

 

The execution(s) received have now been allocated in full.

 

Available allocation Flags

Besides the allocation methods above, user can choose the following flags, which also influence the allocation:

·         Strict per-account allocation.
For the initially submitted order if one or more subaccounts are rejected by the credit checking, we reject the whole order.

·         “Close positions first”1.This is the default handling mode for all orders which close a position (whether or not they are also opening position on the other side or not). The calculation are slightly different and ensure that we do not start opening position for one account if another account still has a position to close, except in few more complex cases.


Other factor affects allocations:

1)      Mutual Fund: the allocation has two steps. The first execution report is received before market open. We allocate based onMonetaryValue for buy order and MonetaryValueShares for sell order. Later, when second execution report which has the NetAssetValue comes, we do the final allocation based on first allocation report.

2)      Allocate in Lot Size: if a user chooses (thru account config) to prefer whole-lot allocations for stocks, the calculations are more complex and will be described in the next version of this document.

3)      Combo allocation1: we allocate combo trades as a unit, resulting in slightly different calculations.

4)      Long/short split1: applied to orders for stocks, warrants or structured products. When allocating long sell orders, we only allocate to accounts which have long position: resulting in calculations being more complex.

5)      For non-guaranteed smart combo: we do allocation by each leg instead of combo.

6)      In case of trade bust or correction1: the allocations are adjusted using more complex logic.

7)      Account exclusion1: Some subaccounts could be excluded from allocation for the following reasons, no trading permission, employee restriction, broker restriction, RejectIfOpening, prop account restrictions, dynamic size violation, MoneyMarketRules restriction for mutual fund. We do not allocate to excluded accountsand we cancel the order after other accounts are filled. In case of partial restriction (e.g. account is permitted to close but not to open, or account has enough excess liquidity only for a portion of the desired position).

 

 

Footnotes:

1.        Details of these calculations will be included in the next revision of this document.

2.        To continue observing margin in each account on a real-time basis, IB allocates each trade immediately (behind the scenes) however from the CTA and/or FA (or client’s) point of view, the final distribution of the execution at an average price typically occurs when the trade is executed in full, is canceled or at the end of day (whichever happens first).

3.       If no account has a ratio greater than 1.0 or multiple accounts are tied in the final step (i.e. ratio = 0.00), the first step is skipped and allocation of the first share/contract is decided via step two (i.e. random allocation).

 

SEC Tick Size Pilot Program FAQs

Tick Size Pilot ("TSP" or "Pilot") Program:

Under the TSP Program,  if IB receives any order in a Pilot Security that does not conform to the designated pricing increment (e.g., a limit price in a $0.01 increment for a security designated as trading $0.05 increments), IB will REJECT that order, subject to limited exceptions. IB strongly encourages a thorough review of your software or your vendor’s software to understand the criteria for what causes an order in a Pilot Security to be rejected to permit you or your vendor to make changes to correctly handle orders in Test Group Pilot Securities.
 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

Q: What is the Tick Size Pilot?
A: On May 6, 2015 the SEC approved an amended TSP NMS Plan. The Pilot will be two years in length. Data collection for the Pilot began on April 4, 2016, 6 months prior to the implementation of the trading and quoting rules for the Pilot. Implementation of the trading and quoting rules for the Pilot will begin on October 3, 2016.

The Pilot will be conducted using a Control Group and three Test Groups where variations in quoting and trading rules exist between each group. Please see the TSP NMS Plan for additional information.

 

Q: Will the Pilot quoting and trading rules apply during regular market hours, pre-market hours and post market hours?
A: The Pilot rules apply during all operational hours (pre-market, regular hours, and post market hours trading).

 

Q: Will the Pilot quoting and trading rules apply to odd-lot and mixed-lot sizes?
A: Yes, the Pilot rules to all order sizes.

 

Q: Will orders in Control Group Securities be accepted in price increments of less than $0.05?
A: Yes, orders submitted in price increments of less than $0.05 will continue to be accepted in Control Group securities.

 

Q: Will orders in a Test Group 1, 2 or 3 Pilot Securities be accepted in price increments of less than $0.05?
A: No, unless covered by an exception, orders submitted in price increments of less than $0.05 will be rejected.

 

Q: Which Pilot Security Orders in Test Groups will Interactive Brokers accept at other than $0.05 increments?
        Midpoint orders with no explicitly stated limit price or impermissible offsets will be accepted
        VWAP orders which do not have an explicitly stated limit price or impermissible offsets will be accepted.
        Interactive Brokers will accept Exchange operated Retail Price Improvement orders as follows:
                  Test Group 1 in $0.001 price increments
                  Test Groups 2 and 3 in $0.005 price increments.

 

Q: Will there be any changes to the Opening / Closing processes on Exchanges?
A: Please refer to each of the exchange rules for details but in general there will be no changes to the Opening / Closing process. All orders entered and eligible to participate in Exchange Opening / Closing Cross will be accepted in increments of $0.05. The Exchanges will begin publishing all quotes in increments of $0.05; however, Net Order Imbalance Indicator prices may be published in increments of $0.025.

 

Q: What will happen to my GTC order that was placed prior to October 3rd in a Pilot Stock that was priced in impermissible tick increments?
A: Interactive Brokers will adjust outstanding limit and stop GTC orders in Pilot stocks in Test Groups that are not in permissible tick increments (e.g., a buy limit order at $5.01 will be adjusted to $5.00 and a sell limit at $5.01 adjusted to $5.05).

 

Q: What will happen to my GTC order placed after October 3rd that was placed and accepted in a nickel tick increment but the Pilot Stock moves from a Test Group to the Control Group which permits non-nickel increments?
A: The GTC order will automatically be able to be revised by the user in non-nickel increments on the date the Pilot stock moves from the Test Group to the Control Group. Similarly, if a stock gets added to Test Group due to a corporate action, IB will cancel the GTC order if it is priced in impermissible increments.

 

Q: Where can I find out more information?

A: See KB2752 or the FINRA website for additional details regarding the Pilot Program: http://www.finra.org/industry/tick-size-pilot-program

Additional Information Regarding the Use of Stop Orders

U.S. equity markets occasionally experience periods of extraordinary volatility and price dislocation. Sometimes these occurrences are prolonged and at other times they are of very short duration. Stop orders may play a role in contributing to downward price pressure and market volatility and may result in executions at prices very far from the trigger price. 

Investors may use stop sell orders to help protect a profit position in the event the price of a stock declines or to limit a loss. In addition, investors with a short position may use stop buy orders to help limit losses in the event of price increases. However, because stop orders, once triggered, become market orders, investors immediately face the same risks inherent with market orders – particularly during volatile market conditions when orders may be executed at prices materially above or below expected prices.
 
While stop orders may be a useful tool for investors to help monitor the price of their positions, stop orders are not without potential risks.  If you choose to trade using stop orders, please keep the following information in mind:
 
·         Stop prices are not guaranteed execution prices. A “stop order” becomes a “market order” when the “stop price” is reached and the resulting order is required to be executed fully and promptly at the current market price. Therefore, the price at which a stop order ultimately is executed may be very different from the investor’s “stop price.” Accordingly, while a customer may receive a prompt execution of a stop order that becomes a market order, during volatile market conditions, the execution price may be significantly different from the stop price, if the market is moving rapidly.
 
·         Stop orders may be triggered by a short-lived, dramatic price change. During periods of volatile market conditions, the price of a stock can move significantly in a short period of time and trigger an execution of a stop order (and the stock may later resume trading at its prior price level). Investors should understand that if their stop order is triggered under these circumstances, their order may be filled at an undesirable price, and the price may subsequently stabilize during the same trading day.
 
·         Sell stop orders may exacerbate price declines during times of extreme volatility. The activation of sell stop orders may add downward price pressure on a security. If triggered during a precipitous price decline, a sell stop order also is more likely to result in an execution well below the stop price.
 
·         Placing a “limit price” on a stop order may help manage some of these risks. A stop order with a “limit price” (a “stop limit” order) becomes a “limit order” when the stock reaches or exceeds the “stop price.” A “limit order” is an order to buy or sell a security for an amount no worse than a specific price (i.e., the “limit price”). By using a stop limit order instead of a regular stop order, a customer will receive additional certainty with respect to the price the customer receives for the stock. However, investors also should be aware that, because a sell order cannot be filled at a price that is lower (or a buy order for a price that is higher) than the limit price selected, there is the possibility that the order will not be filled at all. Customers should consider using limit orders in cases where they prioritize achieving a desired target price more than receiving an immediate execution irrespective of price.
 
·         The risks inherent in stop orders may be higher during illiquid market hours or around the open and close when markets may be more volatile. This may be of heightened importance for illiquid stocks, which may become even harder to sell at the then current price level and may experience added price dislocation during times of extraordinary market volatility. Customers should consider restricting the time of day during which a stop order may be triggered to prevent stop orders from activating during illiquid market hours or around the open and close when markets may be more volatile, and consider using other order types during these periods.
 
·         In light of the risks inherent in using stop orders, customers should carefully consider using other order types that may also be consistent with their trading needs.

Delivery Settings for Shareholder Materials

IB’s default setting for distributing shareholder communications (e.g., proxy materials and annual reports) from U.S. and Canadian issuers is electronic delivery.  Under this method the account holder will receive an email notice when information becomes available for a security they hold from our processing agent, Mediant Communications. This notification will provide the necessary links for accessing the information and voting through the Internet in lieu of receiving these documents via postal service. The technology which you will need to secure the information includes access to the Internet and a web browser supporting secure connections. In addition, you will need to be able to read the documents online and print a copy provided your system supports documents in a PDF format.

 

Other items of note:

 -  We recommend that you add the following addresses to your email address book to minimize the possibility of communications being routed to your junk folder or rejected by your email provider as spam: InteractiveBrokers@proxydocs.com, InteractiveBrokers@investorelections.com, InteractiveBrokers@proxypush.com, InteractiveBrokers@prospectusdocs.com.
 
-  Issuers reserve the right, and are sometimes required by regulation, to send certain shareholder communications via postal mail regardless of the account holder’s preference for electronic delivery. This will most often be the case for interim or special meetings or for contested voting matters.
 
-  Account holders may withdraw their consent to electronic delivery and revert to postal delivery at any time by submitting a request through the Message Center located with Account Management.  Note that changes to delivery settings are not applied to shareholder materials where the record date has already been sent. Account holders may, therefore, continue to receive deliveries for certain securities via the existing method for a period of 2 to 4 weeks after requesting a change.
 

-  The information above applies solely to shareholder communications associated with U.S. and Canadian issuers. The delivery of communications for securities issued outside of these two countries is typically electronic, but managed directly by the issuer or its agent (i.e., not Mediant). 

 

See also: Non-Objecting Beneficial Owner (NOBO)

¿Cuales son las fechas claves en relación con los dividendos de acciones?

Overview: 

Las fechas claves en relación con los dividendos de acciones son las siguientes:

1. Fecha de declaración: fecha en la que la junta de directores de la empresa aprueba el pago de dividendos y designa la fecha de pago y la fecha de cierre de registro.

2. Fecha de cierre de registro: la fecha que determina los accionistas con derecho a recibir el pago del dividendo. Debe ser titular de acciones al final del día de la fecha del cierre de registro para recibir el dividendo.

3. Fecha exdividendo: la fecha en la que las acciones se negociarán sin el derecho a recibir el dividendo. Debido a que la mayoría de las operaciones en acciones en Estados Unidos se liquidan de forma regular, es decir tres días hábiles tras la operación, una persona física debe comprar las acciones tres días hábiles antes de la fecha de cierre de registro para cualificarse para el dividendo. La fecha exdividendo es, por lo tanto, dos días hábiles anterior a la fecha de cierre de registro.

4. Fecha de pago: fecha en la que el dividendo declarado se paga a todos los accionistas que tengan acciones en la fecha de cierre de registro.

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