What’s New for the 2009 Gain/Loss Summary Worksheet

 

 
Wash Sales – If you sold a stock or security at a loss, but re-purchased within 30 days the same or substantially the same security, the Worksheet identifies the sale using code “WS” (Disallowed loss from wash sale).
 
Social Security Number – For security purposes, the first 5 digits of the tax identification number have been removed.
 
Tax Basis Declaration – Two new tax basis methods, made available January 2009, help identify gain/loss methods for trades.  The optional methods Last In, First Out (LIFO) and Maximize Losses (ML) join the default First In, First Out (FIFO) on the Worksheet.
 

Select Gain/Loss Summary Worksheet: Considerations for details about the new features.

Click here to go back to the main 2009 Worksheet article.

 

 

 

IRS Circular 230 Notice: These statements are provided for information purposes only, are not intended to constitute tax advice which may be relied upon to avoid penalties under any federal, state, local or other tax statutes or regulations, and do not resolve any tax issues in your favor.

Understanding the 2009 Gain/Loss Summary Worksheet

IMPORTANT NOTE: This article has been customized for use by individual US taxpayers investing in securities for information purposes only.  Persons are encouraged to consult a qualified tax professional with the preparation of tax returns.  IB does not provide tax advice.  Traders or dealers in securities, for whom other tax treatment applies, may find the worksheet helpful.  The methodology used to determine the yearly gain or loss, however, differs.  Traders electing the mark-to-market accounting method may consult IRS Instructions for Form 4797, page 2.

The 2009 Gain/Loss Summary Worksheet calculates the gain or loss for your securities bought and sold from January 1 through December 31 utilizing the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) guidelines.  Every sell trade executed appears, including short sells, on a trade-date basis.  Not all securities, however, are eligible for inclusion.  For additional information, see the following article categories.


Below we have categorized information about this year's "Worksheet" within the IB Knowledge Base.  Each article provides more details to assist with your understanding of this tool.

 

 

IRS Circular 230 Notice: These statements are provided for information purposes only, are not intended to constitute tax advice which may be relied upon to avoid penalties under any federal, state, local or other tax statutes or regulations, and do not resolve any tax issues in your favor.

2009 Gain/Loss Summary Worksheet: Considerations

概観: 

Interactive Brokers has taken the time to ensure that the gain/loss figures are calculated according to your elected tax methods.  Sell transactions are offset versus the original purchase details available.  Consider the following limitations and issues as you review the Worksheet.

Corporate Actions

For each of the transactions labeled corporate actions, adjustments under to the Worksheet in formation may be required.  The IB Worksheet does not make those adjustments.  Activity classified by the issuer as a sale may be included on the Worksheet, the 1099-B's box 2, and under the Annual Statement’s Corporate Actions section. 

Transactions designated as corporate actions include those processes that impact shareholders by Publicly Traded Companies and result in a material change.  Over 50 voluntary or mandatory actions fall in this category.  Some of the most common processes which may be reported include:   

► Acquisition                              ► Merger

► Captial Reduction                   ► Reverse Split

► Conversion                             ► Rights Issue

► Dividends or Interest              ► Stock Split

 

Option Assignments/Exchanges/Expirations

Options not considered to be Section 1256 contracts appear.  Special rules apply for assignments and exchanges.  The IB Worksheet makes adjustments.  The option transaction’s proceeds do NOT get included on the Worksheet next to the actual trade.  In accordance with IRS guidelines, IB includes the proceeds with the assigned stock.  The IRS Publication 550 on page 57 describes in detail the adjustments required for both the option writer and holder. 

If an option expires during the year, IB enters the expiration date under column (c), Date Sold, 0.00 under column (d), Sales price, and assigns “Ep” under the Codes column.  The gain or loss treatment differs for the option writer and holder.  See IRS Publication 550 for details.

 

Short Sales

Securities sold during the year that you do not own are short sales.  The sale proceeds are included in the 1099-B, box 2, and on the Worksheet, regardless of the year in which the sale is covered or closed.  This may cause a difference in the figure reported for your tax purposes versus the IB Worksheet and the 1099. 

Determination of gain or loss takes place when the security covered is purchased at a later date.  The IB Worksheet makes adjustments for current and prior year sales.  See IRS Publication 550, page 55 for details.

 

Tax Basis Declaration

The default tax basis method for IB accounts is First In, First Out (FIFO).  This matches the the first assets purchased with most recently sold assets for gain and loss tax purposes.  In January 2009, we added an option to allow modification of the tax basis method.  Customers may elect two additional methods, Last In, First Out (LIFO) or Maximize Losses (ML).

On the Worksheet, trades using the default FIFO method do not have an identification code.  For trades using the methods LIFO or Maximize Losses, the following codes apply: 

First In, First Out (FIFO), code = no code appears

Last In, First Out (LIFO), code = LI

Maximize Losses, code = ML

Note:  The tax basis method may be changed for trades going forward through Account Management.  Select Report Management and choose Tax Basis Declaration.

 

Transferred Accounts

The cost of a transferred security reflects the closing price value and date acquired "as of" the transfer settlement date.  An exception applies for cost and date acquired details manually entered by you within Account Management before January 1.  The IB Worksheet makes adjustments for these entries.

If you were unable to complete the online adjustment, then contact your former financial firm for the original cost basis. 

Note:  IB provides the ability through Account Management to update the basis by December 31.  Updates reflect on all future statement records.  Select Report Management and choose Position Transfer Basis.

 

Wash Sales

Stock or security trades sold at a loss, but purchased again within 30 days may be considered wash sales.  The IB Worksheet does identify wash sale trades, beginning in tax year 2009.  Trades considered wash sales are identified by the code “WS” (disallowed loss form wash sales). For more details on trades considered wash sales or the adjustments, see IRS Publication 550, page 56.

 Click here to go back to the main 2009 Worksheet article.

 For information about when all tax forms are made available, go to our Tax Information and Reporting page, then click the Reporting Dates tab.

IRS Circular 230 Notice: These statements are provided for information purposes only, are not intended to constitute tax advice which may be relied upon to avoid penalties under any federal, state, local or other tax statutes or regulations, and do not resolve any tax issues in your favor.

 

 

 

Why are corrected 1099-DIV forms issued ?

Form 1099-DIV is published with the classification or tax character of the dividends at the time of publication.  Issuers may make adjustments or corrections following the required 1099 issue date.  IB is required to re-issue a corrected 1099 with the changes when known to both you and the IRS.

Notification will be sent to you if a corrected 1099 is issued and posted in Account Management. Consult your tax advisor for further guidance.

 

Disclaimer:  IB does not provide tax advice. These statements are provided for information purposes only, are not intended to constitute tax advice which may be relied upon to avoid penalties under any international, federal, state, local or other tax statutes or regulations, and do not resolve any tax issues in your favor. We recommend that you consult a qualified tax advisor or refer to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service.

How do I select my Country of Legal Residence?

概観: 

Choosing the correct Country of Legal Residence for non-US persons is important and may provide lower withholding rates.   All Interactive Brokers accounts must select a Country of Legal Residence due to regulatory and reporting laws.

The Country of Legal Residence is your tax home.  Generally, this is your main place of business, employment, post, regardless of your family home.  It is the place where you work or attend school on a long-term basis, permanantly, or indefinitely. 

For an entity, the tax home is the place where the entity was formed.

Your Country of Legal Residence is not always the same as your Passport Country.  For example, a South African passport holder may attend 4 year university in France.  During the study in France, the student tax home would be considered France. 

What if I pay taxes in two countries this year?

It is possible to pay taxes in two countries and to be considered a Legal Resident of both countries during the same year.  When completing an account application, your choice would be the country in which you currently live and will pay taxes to. 

What if I do not have a regular place of business?

In some cases, persons may not have a regular place of business or home.  Your tax home is the place where you live on a regular basis or wherever you work at the time of your application submission.

What if none of these applies?

Your Country of Legal Residence is wherever you work.

For additional help determining your status as either a non-US Legal Resident or a US Legal Resident, visit www.irs.gov to review the IRS Publication 519 or visit http://www.irs.gov/publications/p519/index.html  

 

Disclaimer:  IB does not provide tax advice. These statements are provided for information purposes only, are not intended to constitute tax advice which may be relied upon to avoid penalties under any international, federal, state, local or other tax statutes or regulations, and do not resolve any tax issues in your favor. We recommend that you consult a qualified tax adviser or refer to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service.

 

How does a non-US person or non-US entity claim a refund of US taxes?

概観: 

Non-US persons or entities must file an income tax return with the United States tax authority in order to claim a refund of over withheld or overpaid tax.

Form 1040NR or Form 1040NR-EZ must be filed by eligible persons with the U.S. tax authority (Internal Revenue Service) to claim a refund.  Use of the forms is limited to non-U.S. persons and non-U.S. entities.   Those filing must have had U.S. tax withheld from U.S. source income.

For questions about "eligibility to file" or "how to file," visit the U.S. Internal Revenue Service online at  www.irs.gov . Enter within the site's search engine one of the following headings for additional information:
 

  • Publication 519, US Tax Guide for Aliens
  • Taxation of Nonresident Aliens
  • Instructions for Form 1040NR

Disclaimer:  IB does not provide tax advice. These statements are provided for information purposes only, are not intended to constitute tax advice which may be relied upon to avoid penalties under any international, federal, state, local or other tax statutes or regulations, and do not resolve any tax issues in your favor. We recommend that you consult a qualified tax advisor or refer to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service.

Tax Reporting: When does Principal Trust send the 1099 information to the IRS?

Background: 

The information will be provided to the IRS by March 31 of the year following the year in which the IRA distribution takes place.

Tax Treaty Benefits

概観: 

Income payments (dividends and payment in lieu) from U.S. sources into your IB account may have U.S. tax withheld.  Generally, a 30% rate is applied to non-U.S. accounts.  Exemption from the withholding or a lower rate may apply if your home country has a tax treaty with the U.S.  Complete the applicable Form W-8 to find out your status. 

Background: 

Tax Treaties*

U.S. tax treaties with some countries have different benefits.  Legal tax residents of the following countries may be eligible for the treaty benefits.  Below is a list of the tax treaty countries.  Benefits vary by country.

Australia Czech Republic India Lithuania Sweden
Austria Denmark Indonesia Poland Switzerland
Bangladesh Egypt Ireland Portugal Thailand
Barbados Estonia Israel Romania Trinidad & Tobago
Belgium Finland Italy Russia Tunisia
Bulgaria France Jamaica Slovak Republic Turkey
Canada Germany Japan Slovenia Ukraine
China, People's Rep. Of Greece Kazakhstan South Africa United Kingdom
Commonwealth of Ind. States Hungary Korea, Rep. of Spain Venezuela
Cyprus Iceland Latvia Sri Lanka  

*Country list as of April 2009

 

Refer to IRS Publication 901 for details on withholding rates for your tax residence country and your eligible benefits.

 

Why am I required to provide a W-8 if I am not a US citizen or resident?

As IB LLC is a carrying broker domiciled in the U.S., it is required to report information and, in certain instances, make payment of withholding taxes to the U.S. tax authority, the Internal Revenue Service for all account holders. To certify oneself as a non-U.S. person, a Form W-8 is requested at the time of application and is required to be re-certified every three years thereafter. If IB does not receive the W-8 or the account holder fails to re-certify the W-8 in a timely manner, then the account holder is presumed to be a US person and, absent a W-9, may then be subject to back-up withholding taxes on interest, dividends and substitute payments in lieu, as well as gross proceeds.

By certifying yourself as a non-U.S. person through a properly completed W-8, your U.S. withholding is limited to dividends issued by US corporations. Note that virtually all countries apply withholding taxes when local companies seek to distribute dividends to externally based shareholders (whether those shareholders are corporate or not). The rate at which IB is obligated to withhold for a given payment depends largely upon whether there is a tax treaty in place between the country where the dividend paying country is based and the country of residence of the dividend recipient.

Which Tax Form Should I Select?

概観: 

3 simple questions can help you choose a tax certification form.   Read the questions and select the form.  For more detailed help, see Tax Information & Reporting.

Question # 1:      Are you a U.S. Person or a U.S. Entity?

• U.S. Citizen • U.S. Business or Organization
• U.S. Green Card Holder • U.S. Domestic Trust
                                       • U.S. Legal Resident

If the answer is YES, complete Form W-9

If the answer is NO, go to # 2.

Question # 2:      Do you have a U.S. Visa?

 

• H-1B Visa Holder • TN Visa Holder         
                                         • O-1 Visa Holder

If the answer is YES, find your status by the "substantial presence test." See More U.S. Legal Resident Info 

If the answer is NO, go to # 3.

Question # 3:      Are you a Legal Resident or Entity of another country?

                                      *Question does Not apply to U.S. Citizens/Entities or Green Card Holders

• Permanent Home Outside of U.S • Entity Formed Outside of U.S.
                                      •Business or Organization formed outside of U.S.

If the answer is YES, complete Form W-8  (U.S. Citizens, Green Card Holders, and Entities still complete the W-9.)

NOT SURE because you work, live, or study in the U.S. then, see More U.S. Legal Resident Info 

 

Disclaimer:  IB does not provide tax advice. These statements are provided for information purposes only, are not intended to constitute tax advice which may be relied upon to avoid penalties under any international, federal, state, local or other tax statutes or regulations, and do not resolve any tax issues in your favor. We recommend that you consult a qualified tax adviser or refer to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service.

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